you tube problem

Discussion in 'The Counter' started by fez, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    My windows xp has been tooling along just fine for my simple needs and I don't know if the problem is related to it but SUDDENLY you tube videos freeze. They play for about 10 seconds and stop. I have Firefox and also tried Opera but no dice. Again this just recently developed. I have not made any changes to my system. Any ideas? Please try to use laymans terms as best you can. I'm not into computer lingo. LOL.
     
  2. haertig

    haertig Well-Known Member

    Jun 14, 2008
    Colorado
    Hi Fez -

    Because you are running an old and unsupported OS (Windows XP) I might assume that you are also running an old version of Firefox. The first thing you might want to try is to upgrade Firefox to the newest version. This will be good for your computer security as well as possibly good for getting your YouTube videos to play. Maybe that's all you need to do ... upgrade Firefox.

    But you may also be having problems with your Flash video player plugin. Again, because you are probably using an older version of Firefox (I'm assuming that), then Firefox might be trying to play these YouTube videos using Flash. The newer standard for video playback is HTML5. You can try this test:

    Go to this YouTube video:

    https: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsOUcikyGRk

    (Note that this URL has a SPACE character after "https:", that makes it so that you cannot click on it to play the video. You have to manually enter that URL into your web browser, and remove that extraneous SPACE character manually. If I had not put that SPACE in the URL, then you would see the actual video right here in my post. I don't want you to see the video directly, I want you to see the URL pointing to it, so you can do manual testing. Just remove that extra SPACE character before you try to use the URL.)

    If you don't like my choice above, pick a different YouTube video. Doesn't matter what it is, we just want to test if we can play it.

    I am assuming that the above video will fail based on your description in your first post.

    Now, change that above video URL to:

    https: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsOUcikyGRk&html5=1

    Note that this new URL is the same as the previous URL, except I added &html5=1 on the end of it. I don't know if this trick will work on your (assumed) older Firefox or not, but it won't hurt to try.

    Does this new video URL work better?

    If it works better, that helps narrow down your problem to a Flash issue. There are better ways to deal with this than adding &html5=1 to each and every URL you want to look at manually (that would be a nightmare). But just try it this way manually at first, to see if it fixes your problem. If it does, then we can look into some Firefox extensions that you can add to do this automatically for you.

    Here's a short blog post that describes what I've said above, probably in a much clearer way than I described it!

    http://www.guidingtech.com/35075/force-html5-videos/
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2017

  3. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    I have the latest Firefox and Flash. When I click on your 1st link(nice music and girl by the way) it played and stopped. I got out of it then clicked back into it and it played all the way. What do you think?
     
  4. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    It seems some videos play ok. With or w/o html5. We'll see how it goes. Thanks for the info.
     
  5. haertig

    haertig Well-Known Member

    Jun 14, 2008
    Colorado
    So without changing anything, simply trying again, it worked. Intermittent problems are harder to solve. One thing that comes to mind, is the first ime you play a video, it is streaming from the internet to your computer. The sceond time, it is probably playing from cache on you computer and not necessarily downloading from the internet. Playing from cache would be much faster. Could it be that you are having intermittent internet connectivity problems? Or is your internet just a very slow connections, and what you are seeing on the first time playing something is buffering of the data streaming in slowly? There could also be some problem with your internet service provider, your modem, your router, or your computer.

    How about when you play videos locally? I'm talking about ones that are stored on your computer and you are not using the internet to access. Do you have any of those to test with?

    What would be a good test, is to find a YouTube video that you have had problems with. Download that to your computer. Then try to play it locally as a test. This could help isolate if it's a problem in your computer, your internet access, or possibly in the actual video itself. The problem here, is that recently YouTube has made it much more difficult to download their videos. It used to be easy to do, but not so much anymore. There are many "Video Downloaders" that you can install as a Firefox extension. But they don't work like they used to with YouTube cracking down on things. I'm not sure if it's YouTube doing the cracking down, or if YouTube has just "negotiated" with the video downloader developers to remove the capability from their apps, under threat of lawsuit.

    The only real help I can offer you currently is to recommend using the scientific method that we were all taught in school (at least I was, but then, I'm an engineer so it was part of the curriculum). The scientific method includes testing and testing, but only changing ONE variable at a time, to isolate what the critical component is. So that's why I'm asking if you can play videos locally vs. over the internet. We are trying to isolate if it's the internet that is causing the problem. Ditto for when I asked you to play it using Flash vs. HTML5. Trying to isolate if it's the played (realize though, that since you're already running the latest Firefox, an assumption that I got wrong initially, then it might already be playing your videos using HTML5 by default). If you find that your problem is the internet, then you try playing the video a first time from the internet, vs. a second time, to try and isolate if it's related to caching or not. Obviously, this would require you to stream a DIFFERENT video as you test and re-test, because you can only play a video "the first time" once (or until you flush your cache, or reboot, or your computer runs low on memory/disk space and automatically flushes it's own cache).

    So you have to come up with a hypothesis, and then change one thing at a time to prove/disprove that hypothesis. You already did some of that when you said you tried Firefox vs. Opera. Since they both failed for you, that means it's most likely something OTHER than the specific browser. Although it still could be browser related, if both Firefox and Opera do a similar thing internally - like default to use Flash instead of HTML5 - and both are having problems with it.

    Intermittent problems suck to debug!
     
  6. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    I'll have to work on this. One other thing. When the video stops a blue bar pops up under it that says basically: Having problems? Find out why. When I click to find out up comes a Google video report. Why would a Google report come up when I'm using Firefox?
     
  7. haertig

    haertig Well-Known Member

    Jun 14, 2008
    Colorado
    I am highly suspicious of you having a problem, and then a pop-up magically appears, coincidentally, asking if you, by chance, are having a problem. Highly suspicious. I would add "scan for viruses, malware, and intrusive ad plugins" to the list of things you are doing to investigate this. And I certainly would not click on that popup. Maybe it's some harmless feature of software that you have, but it sounds scary to me.
     
    haugrdr likes this.
  8. TxCajun

    TxCajun Administrator Staff Member Supporter

    Sep 7, 2004
    Texas
    Ditto. Sounds suspicious to me...
     
  9. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    Well it's back to normal. Don't remember all the things I tried but something must have worked. The last things I did was shut my computer off. Reset my router. Used the 360p setting on the video. Tested a few that were stopping before and now they play thru. Along with new ones I tried. I used my Avast and Malwarebytes to scan for problems. None found. It's beyond me but thanks for the support.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2017
  10. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    Please please please stop using XP. It hasn't gotten security updates in years and the installation is, without a doubt, compromised by something by now.

    I cannot emphasize this enough, it is not just your PC which is being affected. Your PC is almost certainly being hijacked to make life miserable for other users on the 'net.

    If you, like me, are a cheap son-of-a-gun, replace it with Linux. There are a thousand good distributions ("Distros"). Pick one. I like PCLinuxOS.

    https://itsfoss.com/linux-replace-windows-xp/
    http://www.pcworld.com/article/2107...ndows-xp-refugees-who-dont-want-a-new-pc.html

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  11. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    Is this something I purchase and install myself or do I take my computer to someone to update? Pardon my ignorance but I almost get it with computer stuff but I hit a wall at times.
     
  12. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    Most Linux distros are "free." You download the ISO disk image and burn it to a DVD writable disk. This becomes your install media.

    Bigger names in the Linux community, such as Mint, CentOS, Debian, PCLinuxOS, Ubuntu, etc. all have an online updating process with continuing support. Click on a button and watch the distro download and install all the updates from the distro's internet servers. When a version reaches the life-cycle end, as always happens eventually, repeat the process with the latest ISO.

    Be sure to read the "new user/new installer" info on the website. It has helpful tips for first time installers (like "back up your data").

    All of the big name ones are easy to install. You should be fine.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  13. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    Thanks for the tips. I don't think I have a dvd burner though.
     
  14. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    Some still have CD ISO's. Does your drive read DVD's?

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  15. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    Not sure. How can I tell? Never tried to burn anything.
     
  16. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    If it is capable of reading DVD's (not necessarily burning, just reading), it should say DVD-ROM on the face of the tray or optical reader.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  17. JAB

    JAB Well-Known Member

    May 6, 2010
    East Tennessee
    I have found that sometimes YouTube videos just kind of seize up but if I click on the progress bar just a second or to ahead of where it is frozen (to jump the video ahead just by that second or two) they will resume playing just fine. Strangely, sometimes if I click a few seconds BEFORE where it is frozen it will play fine, again, until it gets to the spot where it previously froze and then it will once again freeze up in the same spot.
     
  18. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    On the disc door it says: Compact disc rewritable. dvd r/rw. dvd-r+rdl. What do you think?
     
  19. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    Your optical drive is a DVD writer and can burn standard DVD-R disks. One of your computer friends locally will probably give you a blank disk for free.

    Download the single-disk DVD installation ISO of whichever linux distro sounds easiest for you to transition to and burn it. Follow the instructions. Again, backup your data. Once the install dVD is burned, you'll have to set your BIOS to "boot from optical/DVD" or whatever they call it. Put the disk in, reboot your sys, follow the on-screen directions.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  20. fez

    fez Well-Known Member

    Jun 24, 2009
    florida
    I have some blank discs when I had a side by side dvd player. Same same?