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Sounds like you must have the Gen 1....... Mine is crazy accurate.
Same here. The one I had ... well, still have, if you count my wife's guns as also being "mine," since she wound up with it :D ... that thing was/is WAY more accurate than my so-so skills will ever be. VERY nice trigger, low recoil, big flash and boom, not super expensive ammo, 30 rounds in a mag, and super easy to load with a "nest" style loader ... fun times all around.

Aaaaaand I need to get me another one now. :p
 

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Yeah, even if that is a .22 lr and just a tiny pistol, I'm not getting in line to try it.
Ryan might, I'll pass.

Lop
 

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I posted a picture of a 600. You said you had one but ammo was hard to find. I said mine was a 9mm 600. I asked if you were thinking about the 400 largo. You said yes the 600. The 600 is 9mm Luger, not 9mm largo.
Then it was a simple mix up. I have the 400, as I said. The 9x23 Largo can be pretty hard to find, as I said. I've owned it since around 1995 or so.

Would you like a photo?

 

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Not really weird per se but rather obscure. The IMI Timberwolf was imported from Israel in 1989 and was gone by 1991. It was a slide/pump action in 357 and 44 mag. The cool thing about it that is had a quick detachable take down stock. They were very high quality.

I just picked one up in unfired condition in 357 mag a couple months ago. I've put about 500 rounds through it (mostly reloaded 38s). It's a lot of fun to shoot.





And the take down thumb screw

 

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Discussion Starter #70
Not really weird per se but rather obscure. The IMI Timberwolf was imported from Israel in 1989 and was gone by 1991. It was a slide/pump action in 357 and 44 mag. The cool thing about it that is had a quick detachable take down stock. They were very high quality.

I just picked one up in unfired condition in 357 mag a couple months ago. I've put about 500 rounds through it (mostly reloaded 38s). It's a lot of fun to shoot.





And the take down thumb screw

Had two in .357. one silver (sister got it) and I still have the blue.
 

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Had two in .357. one silver (sister got it) and I still have the blue.
You lucky dog! That pump rifle looks a LOT more elegant than the Vulcan pump .44 mag I once lusted after:



As you probably tell, the rear half is an M1 carbine while the front half did away with the carbines gas system and was replaced by a weird pump action to suit the .44 mag caliber.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
Another factoid about the Timber Wolf is that the stock was adjustable for angle.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
Not really weird per se but rather obscure. The IMI Timberwolf was imported from Israel in 1989 and was gone by 1991. It was a slide/pump action in 357 and 44 mag. The cool thing about it that is had a quick detachable take down stock. They were very high quality.

I just picked one up in unfired condition in 357 mag a couple months ago. I've put about 500 rounds through it (mostly reloaded 38s). It's a lot of fun to shoot.





And the take down thumb screw

Ready to sell off my Timberwoof .357 Blue. Perfect condition, I never shot it.
PM if interested.
 

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My favorite "weird" gun (at least what I own) is the Chiappa Rhino. A revolver that fires from the bottom chamber instead of the top, it puts the recoil straight back instead of over the top of your grip, making muzzle-flip virtually non-existent even with .357 Magnum and reducing discomfort. Even with the factory wood grips, my hands aren't sore at all after several cylinders full of .357 with it; using any conventional wheelgun, even with squishy rubber grips, I at least wanna take a break after a few cylinders' worth.

Additionally, when you cock the hammer for a single-action shot, the hammer doesn't stay back because, well ... it's not even a hammer, really. It's just a cocking device. You pull it back, the trigger stages rearward for a light, easy, short pull, and the "hammer" thingy goes forward when you let go of it. The internals of the Rhino are truly WEIRD. Scary Swiss watch type stuff that I'd NEVER wanna risk taking apart to service. But whatever's going on in there, it makes for a SUPER smooth and easy double-action pull with a VERY nice single-action pull. I've had a few pretty nice Smith & Wesson revolvers with triggers that didn't quite compare to this thing, and it's been by far the easiest-to-shoot-accurately wheelgun I've ever owned.

And, let's face it, the thing just looks all kinds of strange, which is the reason why you see them so often in sci-fi TV shows and movies, sometimes dressed up a bit, most notably in "Suicide Squad" and Netflix's "Altered Carbon" (and awesome show, BTW):


It has also made into some Japanese animation as well. Asobi ni Kyo for one. But Iv'e like it since it came out. I just cannot afford a $900 revolver at the moment. But it is my favorite modern revolver. My current one is the Smith & Wesson Model of 1917 U.S Army revolver in .45 ACP.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
20200917_122633.jpg
I dunno if this got skipped, but it definitely belongs
Only from Taurus, the iconic Curve .380
 

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It has also made into some Japanese animation as well. Asobi ni Kyo for one. But Iv'e like it since it came out. I just cannot afford a $900 revolver at the moment. But it is my favorite modern revolver. My current one is the Smith & Wesson Model of 1917 U.S Army revolver in .45 ACP.
I wish I still had my S&W 1917 .45! I couldn't believe how much "softer" the recoil felt when my standard hardball handloads were fired in it compared to my Colt Combat Commander or even my full size 1911s. The autos slide slamming against the frame stop during recoil made the autos recoil feel "snappier" with a bit of sharp muzzle flip compared to the revolver. Anyone who actually shoots the 1917 and 1911 side by side can instantly feel the difference. It was a big, rugged, utterly reliable, historic sidearm. I had to sell mine, along with a hell of a lot of others, during my starving years. Sigh. Another one I wish I had that one back.....:oops:
 

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Hell yes! The weird Guns thread is back!
I love this thread!

How about the American 180 full auto .22? I once watched a televised demo put on for the Lubbock, Texas police department where the shooter dissolved a section of cinder block wall with a hurricane of .22 lr bullets.


How about full auto .22 lr in suppressed mode?

 
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