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Discussion Starter #1
Discussion relates to the proper orientation of parts 316, 319, 322 of the bolt carrier group as noted in the owner’s manual page 13.

I noticed something after a few times recently cleaning the RDB. I’m surprised I hadn’t noticed it before. I think maybe I thought it was a lack of proper lubrication that was making my RDB more difficult to rack.

It turns out that it was the action spring orientation on the action rod weldment.

The action spring can be put in backwards if you remove it from the action rod and the bolt carrier group. There is not much of a difference between the 2 sides of the spring, and I don’t know if KT even installed it correctly- I can only assume that I was the one who turned it around backwards.

The only way I can tell if the action spring is installed correctly is if it is difficult to fit it back into the bolt carrier, and it is difficult to go back on to the action rod. If it is installed backwards, the spring fits easily into the bolt carrier, and easily over the action rod, but the action rod will bind slightly at the end of it’s travel. The slightly different sized ends must be intentional. The action spring will start going into the bolt carrier when correctly installed, and will start to go on to the action rod- but both will stop after about 1/4” or so. When you push the action rod/spring assembly into the bolt carrier, then ithe spring will seat fully into the bolt carrier and fully on to the action rod.

I hope that explanation was correct, if your spring fits easily on the action rod after cleaning, turn it around. When you reassemble the rifle, you will notice the difference In how easy it is to cycle the action. I do not know if it is possible to open up an action spring so that it works the same both ways. Mine doesn’t. One way is clearly superior.
 

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I had experience with I think 3 RDBs, in two of them spring could be easily removed (though it is NOT part of take down and cleaning). Now, on my 3rd RDB (first was sold, second is on the warranty trip because of double-fires) spring was so hard to remove that I stretched it in two places. Took two days to form it back more or less. Not perfect, but works. And yes, it's important how the spring is installed. Forward end is wider and if fits into weldment not easy. Rear end is a bit narrow to catch the groove on the rod.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I fully disassembled mine early on in an attempt to use a “permanent” dry lube on all moving parts- including that spring. I don’t recall it being that difficult to remove the first time, but there was factory lube which I had to remove with solvent.

This was done after my gas piston locked up due to factory lube that couldn’t handle the heat from the gas. It took me a long time to pry the piston assembly apart without damaging it, so I took EVERYTHING apart.

I probably didn’t screw it up that time because I‘m sure I would’ve laid the parts out how they disassembled. It’s only after a few times when I think I know what I’m doing that I start to screw up. What I noticed eventually was that the action got really clunky. It still worked, I‘m certain I fired it improperly assembled at some point. Upon cleaning and re-assembling one time, I worked the rod, and noticed the operation was not smooth. I kept playing with it, and trying to figure out what happened. I deduced that the spring was binding as the rod entered it‘s final inch of travel. I noticed it appeared that it might jump the spring stop on the rod. I swapped the spring around, noticing that it now fit so tightly into the BCG weldment that it would only fully seat when I pushed the rod into the tube. After swapping the spring around, I noticed how smooth the assembled action operated.

I didn’t know that everyone didn’t fully disassemble their weapon. I haven’t taken the lower apart, but there isn’t anything in there that I need to mess with.

Maybe we should consider putting up a full disassembly thread. I can’t recall what the owner’s manual says, or if it recommends lubing these parts. I go to excess, but I like how mechanical things work, and seeing how I can make them work better without major modification. It’s a brain teaser of sorts. I‘m the same with cars and guns. I just got tired of messing with the cars all the time now that I’m older. (Say no to fart cans, but yes to port matching and polishing)
 

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Can the action spring rod even come out on those rifles that have bolt carriers without a roll pin securing the rod? I've looked at mine several times and I can't see how the rod separates from the carrier. At the same time, I wasn't going to yank on it either.
 

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Can the action spring rod even come out on those rifles that have bolt carriers without a roll pin securing the rod? I've looked at mine several times and I can't see how the rod separates from the carrier. At the same time, I wasn't going to yank on it either.
roll pin?? Can you put up a pic? Ive had 2 bolt carrier, three actually, and none had been pinned but its a very good idea, especially in the front.
 

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Sorry, not a roll pin. I'm going from memory of an exploded diagram of the first gen bolt carriers. I know the action spring guide rod was held captive.
 

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yea, that was a spring and pawl or catch.
Known to fail, hence the elimination of that part. That was the gen1 captured action spring version. The one I had failed because the front plug, that holds the spring from coming out the front, released and came out the front.
54936

The weld puddle wasn't stamped enough, if at all. This is where I wish KT had used a pin. And KT continues to use the same construction on current RDB today.
In the end, with the catch and plug failures, it was decided a captive spring was too much tension on both ends. RDBers should make plug depth checks a regular point of inspection to see if theirs is walking out.
Also guys who have to disassemble everything were taking them apart, a chore the rear catch clearly wasn't well designed for.
The gen2 saw changes in the Action spring, firing pin, firing pin spring, extractor pin and I think a bottom lug (pickup lug?) reduction.
The walking extractor pin fix was implemented on later G1s as well.
 
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