Technical question #1...ejector / extractor

Discussion in 'P-3AT' started by dgreer, Nov 26, 2007.

  1. dgreer

    dgreer New Member

    36
    Nov 14, 2007
    Hi folks,

    I am a new gun owner and a new shooter. Can anyone help me understand the operation of the ejector / extractor combination? I know what the end result of the operation is but am just curious.

    I can see when a round is chambered how the extractor grabs the casing, but after close examination of the ejector ( and contemplating the odd shape ) I can't figure exactly what it does. It is not a life or death thing...I am just curious to completely understand the operation of the weapon. :-/

    Thanks in advance,

    DG
     
  2. c0wboi38

    c0wboi38 New Member

    Sep 19, 2006
    While I can't give you an EXACT play by play....I'll do what I can.

    As the slide moves back, the extractor grabs the rim of the casing, and starts to pull it out of the barrel. It travels rear-ward under the grip of said extractor, until it hits the ejector. The shape of which is supposed to direct the casing out. So the back of the casing hits the ejector, which knocks it loose, and kicks it on out of the port.

    That's the layman's description.
     

  3. adamsesq

    adamsesq New Member

    Dec 25, 2006
    Nice description. I would add only that the role of the ejector is often also played by the next round coming up through the magazine. In many weapons there is no dedicated ejector piece formed like the P3ATs is, although there usually is something that plays that role. In your P3AT many find that it performs fully and completely without out and others find it plays nice except for the last round.

    -Scott
     
  4. dgreer

    dgreer New Member

    36
    Nov 14, 2007
    Thank you for the quick replies.

    I suppose the rearward action of the slide/extractor causes the rear edge of the casing to contact that very small angled part of the ejector causing it to kick upward. That, coupled with the spring action of the next round moving up must be what sends the casing flying.

    I think I get it! ;)