Community for Kel-Tec Shooters banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can I safely unload boxes of shot or bullets (dump them) into an ammo box? or do I need to store full boxes or bullets/shells all in one direction? (Maybe a deeper question is, why do ammo boxes exist?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Can I safely unload boxes of shot or bullets (dump them) into an ammo box? or do I need to store full boxes or bullets/shells all in one direction? (Maybe a deeper question is, why do ammo boxes exist?)
It's a matter of personal preference. Safety wise, it.is OK. The key thing is to segregate it so you know what you have in regards to weight, caliber, etc. so that when you go to shoot it, you know how it runs through your firearm (velocity, ballistics, etc. When I store ammo loose, I tear off the flap of the box it came in and place it on top of the loose ammo. I also write the date of purchase on it with a sharpie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
Can I safely unload boxes of shot or bullets (dump them) into an ammo box? or do I need to store full boxes or bullets/shells all in one direction? (Maybe a deeper question is, why do ammo boxes exist?)
I assume you mean an ammo can?

Why do they exist? Well, to insure dry conditions no matter what happens around them, such as the ammo bunker leaking or the LST taking on water. That would be my guess since what we know as an ammo can here in the USA had it's roots in WW2 that I know of. Maybe sooner but I'm not aware of it. Must you use them? No. Not if your ammo storage will be dry and remain that way. Personally even though my storage is pretty good I insure those dry conditions, w/o mouse urine and such by using surplus ammo cans. FWIW, most of my ammo storage is in an outbuilding. FWIW, when I write "ammo can" I mean the metal surplus military cans, .50 and .30 calber. There are also boxes that I put finished rounds into and I use those because my mag' loaders work with them in the bullet down attitude.

The only suggested conditions that I know of for ammo storage is this... if you'd be comfortable under the same conditions so will ammo. That means dry and comfy temps, colder is OK, hot will degrade the powder. How long will ammo last if properly stored? Many decades. I'm currently shooting .22 rimfire ammo that I bought in the '70s, and ammo made during WW2 is still good today.

I was given some .30/03 (not a typo) that was made sometime near 1907 that had NOT been stored in good conditions. The cardboard boxes had deteriorated and so had the powder. Some of the brass had verdigris. I never tried to fire any of it because I didn't want the corrosive primers anywhere near my guns. The packaging stank of mouse urine and mouse feces was in the wooden case. How do I know the powder had deteriorated? Powder such as that gets powdery and reddish and has an acrid odor. It doesn't mean the cartridge won't go bang or that the firearm it's used in will explode, but the cartridge won't have the same power aa one that was stored correctly. I disassembled the cartridges (What a fool I was!) saving what I could and put the powder in a pile and lit it. It made for a 20" tall geyser of flame for 10 seconds or so. The bullets are German silver (cupro-nickle) and some of the prettiest things you ever saw. Many of the necks had cracked but probably the brass could probably be formed into .30/06 after annealing so I saved it.

But back to your question. Do you need to use either boxes or cans? No. I do for convenience. At my feet as I type I have a few ammo boxes stacked up and full of ammo. Also there is freshly made ammo in plastic 100 round boxes in the same location. Since it's my home the storage conditions are perfect. FWIW, the ammo in the steel ammo boxes was made in the '80s and is perfect.

Orientation of cartridges for storage? You can store them haphazardly if you wish. Or orient them in a certain way. Again, I use ammo boxes inside the ammo cans and that ammo is stored bullet down, but only because my mag loaders want to see the base of the bullet. Some of my ammo is stored on stripped clips and are layed down horizontally in the ammo cans. The key isn't cartridge orientation in storage but the conditions.

I hope I answered your question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
I only dump ammo of the same sort into a can loose. I also use the plastic mtm cases, they never rust as my metal ones will do. SO I've got bulk 9mm dumped into a 30 cal can. I would avoid doing so with a lead round nose bullet, for the sake of creating lead dust. You're already exposed to enough of that shooting so don't increase it by poor handling of ammo. Since we're in the ksg department, it's safe to store loose shot gun shells all together in an ammo can but I'd leave the buck shot and slugs separate.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gnarls

·
Registered
Joined
·
732 Posts
Can I safely unload boxes of shot or bullets (dump them) into an ammo box? or do I need to store full boxes or bullets/shells all in one direction? (Maybe a deeper question is, why do ammo boxes exist?)
To keep the ammo organized, labeled and protected. I see little reason to not use the boxes, just store them in ammo cans . If you have so much ammo that the space savings becomes a factor you likely have the funds to remedy that issue. If you just dump your ammo loose in whatever years later it will be of questionable value for a variety of reasons. Properly stored in marked boxes in good ammo cans your great great grandchildren could make use of it 50 years after you have left the planet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
I use G.I. ammo cans to store powder, primers, and ammo because they are strong, moisture proof, air proof, light proof, critter proof, and have heavy duty carrying handles. I generally use 20mm and 50 caliber ammo cans. The .30 caliber cans are too small for my use. I only use the metal ammo cans in good shape with intact ( pristine ) neoprene seal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
I'm not sitting on a ton of ammo, I just store ammo in boxes inside plastic ammo cans. The boxes help me keep up with what's what, caliber,weight,brand ect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Can I safely unload boxes of shot or bullets (dump them) into an ammo box? or do I need to store full boxes or bullets/shells all in one direction? (Maybe a deeper question is, why do ammo boxes exist?)
Yes. Keep them dry and they’ll be just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
It's not that sensitive. We fight wars with them and a battlefield is NOT a kind place to be and no one has the inclination when being fired at to worry about their ammo being sensitive to shock. They have other things on their minds. My point is that ammo can take a beating, much more than any of us are likely to give it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
.50 cal. cans are the best. Pick ones with no holes or sizable dents, working latches, and good seals. I date the factory boxes (month & year) before carefully arranging them in the cans. Also, I apply some vaseline to the seals to keep them pliable and the can watertight. The cans are kept in a cool basement,
I'm currently shooting 40-year-old Remington .22LR stored as described above. Check out the Twisted Industries home page picture of my PF9 and conversion unit. Look closely and you can see the Remingtons on the left bearing a purchase date of "7/80." Although I'm on the last brick, it still fires perfectly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Personally, I like organization and ease of use. Keeping ammo in their original boxes stores, stacks, and arranges easily and I know immediately at a glance that there are 10, 25, 50, 100, etc rounds in a respective box.
I save my .22LR Mini-Mag boxes and refill them from buckets of Golden Bullets for the same reason. It is also much easier to access rounds for reloading at the range from an organized box, than a random pile, IMHO. But I don’t worry about the bulk loose ammo while in longer term storage.
I would recommend getting ammo cans that you can comfortably carry, while full, and keep your boxes of ammo, and any extra magazines (loaded) in them.
If you’re worried about degradation, get some desiccant packs and throw them in with the ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,042 Posts
I will keep it really simple.
You can't set ammo off if you follow common sense (eg don't store it in your oven or fireplace).
Ammo is subject to damp; it can slowly get past the bullet or primer into the powder and ruin the round so it won't fire. This takes some time to do, so just keep it in a 'reasonably dry' place.

So the biggest concern I would list safety wise is DO NOT MAKE A BOMB.
ok, so what is a bomb? If you take a pile of gunpowder or a quart of gas and throw them on a fire, you get a firey whoosh, but no explosion. Why? The fuel is not compressed in any way that builds up pressure when it burns.
so do not store your ammo in a super strong box that will build up a ton of pressure before it fails, like a pressure cooker or an industrial grade hard metal box, or a giant glass bottle, etc. You don't want a small house fire to leave a crater instead of a little smoke damage :)

I personally use plastic containers, but am tightfisted and those are cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
<snip> If you take a pile of gunpowder or a quart of gas and throw them on a fire, you get a firey whoosh, but no explosion. Why? The fuel is not compressed in any way that builds up pressure when it burns.
<snip>
I was discussing this with my eye Dr just yesterday. He mentioned that ammo was "explosive". I don't recall just how it was said. I corrected him about smokeless gunpowder just being flammable. But contain it and the bursting pressure is something like 300k psi. That gives the illusion that it's an explosion. Black powder is entirely different and that is a low order explosive.

Surplus ammo cans won't allow much pressure build up before they burst, and if there's no containment there is low pressure. But the primers will make it sound like Chinese New Year*. And it's been many years since I saw smokeless powder sold in anything other than plastic.

OK, so taking it a bit further, will "exploding" cartridges in a fire hurt you if you're struck by them? The short answer is no. Again they aren't contained in any meaningful manner, only the case and the, at worst, crimped bullet holds the case closed. Whatever is the lightest part of the cartridge will get the most velocity, but it's going to be nowhere near like a bullet. It might travel a few feet and no more. But take the same cartridge and contain it in a steel chamber where the pressure is contained and channeled into driving the bullet down the barrel and it's completely different.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top