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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there one brand or material type that you prefer over others? Do you prefer certain brands for certain guns? Pistols vs revolvers? Rifles vs shotguns? Etc. I'm ready to step up my game a little and now is the perfect time while it's cold outside and funds are low, so I'm not hitting the indoor range as much. I could be dry firing in my garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Follow-up question- wax bullets. Could they be used safely in my garage? I'm reading that they shatter on impact and there is no recoil. Do you still get a big boom? I live too close to people to get away with the noise.
 

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What to buy depends on whether you need snap caps to pad the firing pin, or whether you want to practice loading and operating the gun.

If it's operation you want, you probably would want action proving dummies.
Snap caps are usually not the actual size of a live round and often don't feed correctly through a firearm.

Action proving dummies may not be snap caps, but they exactly duplicate the actual size, shape, weight, and balance of a live round.
These are designed to check the operation of a firearm and practice loading.

You can buy snap caps and action proving dummies from Brownell's and Midway.
Some will serve as both.

For wax bullets, that depends on what type of firearm you want to use.
These work in pistols and revolvers, probably not in rifles or shotguns.

Wax bullets are usually propelled by just a primer, which gives enough force to use at short distances.
If you want more distance, I seem to recall that it's possible to load the case with a VERY light powder charge, but it has to be light enough not to cause the wax bullet to start to melt in the barrel.

Another option for practice are soft plastic bullets.
I haven't seen these advertised lately, but are probably still available.
These are reusable and usually give good accuracy at moderate distances.
Speer did make plastic bullets with plastic cases into which the plastic bullets are slipped. Primed, these reportedly shot well.
Do a web search for plastic bullets and you can find more sources:

http://www.huntingtons.com/store/product.php?productid=17173

In all cases, you need to be careful about air circulation because you don't want to breath the primer fumes.

Noise is very low since all you're using is a standard pistol primer.
 

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Most centerfire guns do not need snapcaps. Dry firing is OK. But not all. A good example is the Keltec PF9. Repeated dryfiring without snapcaps, will damage the firing pin retention screw. Not expensive to fix (it's just a screw), but if damaged it can be difficult to get out.

Rimfire needs snapcaps. Some rimfire guns may have a cutout in the breech to negate the need for snapcaps, but it's besst to just generally assume that all rimfires should use snapcaps. Rimfire snapcaps do not last long before they self destruct. And rimfire "action proving rounds" are even less durable.

I do not use "snapcaps" per se. I use drywall anchors. The last much longer and are so cheap as to be inconsequential in cost. Get the #4-8 x 7/8 in ones. They extract just fine which is a bonus. Feeding from a magazine by manually cycling the slide is hit of miss. You may have to manually insert them into the chamber. But once in the chamber, they are good for repeated use. To keep using the same one, just rotate it in the chamber a few degrees every so often.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Crown-B...bed-Plastic-Anchors-100-Piece-54772/100338197

Another option to practice at home is with a pellet gun. You can get some really nice ones with good triggers (and some really bad ones with horrendous triggers). even a BB gun may suffice. I have a "Remington RAC 1911" BB pistol that is a clone of a real 1911 in weight and feel, and it has a reasonable trigger. You're not going to be shooting accurately at 25 yards with it, but up close it's pretty good. And you get to practice trigger control, breathing control, etc.

This this post I did here on KTOG a few years back regarding pellet/BB gun shooting at home:

https://www.thektog.org/threads/for...ccess-to-a-shooting-range.263408/#post2346749
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a few if the Speer plastic bullets I got from my dads stash but haven't used them. I mostly want to practice firing technique without damaging firing pin. Or wasting a ton of ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Buddy of mine says he has taken a casing and tapped the primer out and put a dab of hot glue in there. He said it works great and is basically free.
 

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I'd refer to the manufacture's site for the use of snapcaps or what not. I'm not aware of any center fire revolvers that need them. I dry fired the snot out of some of my wheelies. Keep in mind, you can't make a gun that can with stand 12000 to 60000 psi out of cheap stuff. If it can handle the boom, it can probably handle the click. The exceptions are rimfires and those guns that have issues like the pf9.

Do you have reloading equipment? If so, primer only rounds are easy to use. One issue is that your sites won't be right. Another is the ventilation bit.

I would suggest dry fire (if possible) for most of the training, and using a air gun. Some say that a bad trigger is a bad thing. But think about it, if you practice with a bad trigger and get good at it, what will a good trigger do for you?

Trigger time is trigger time. I have two 'adult air rifles' One is a beeman with a great trigger, the other a Benjie with more power and a pretty bad trigger. Both are .22 cal and make for good hunting guns. Yeah, they are rifles, but they have triggers, and trigger time is trigger time.

lop

btw, one of my dogs. Trigger. He came pre-named, but I didn't feel the need to re-name him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Trigger is a good looking boy! I will double check with manufacturers before doing anything. I mostly would be dry firing my s/w snub nose .38 special, my hi-point c9, my baby browning, and my super Blackhawk. Not too concerned about my plinkers or my pmr. I will think about my long guns later.
 

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Buddy of mine says he has taken a casing and tapped the primer out and put a dab of hot glue in there. He said it works great and is basically free.
No. The glue won't self heal properly. It will fall apart or the pin will work a divot that will be useless.
 

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I like this option:
https://www.laserlyte.com/products/trainer-lt-cartridge

It is a laser cartridge that is firing pin activated. Safe and you can place the target in a variety of positions and distances. This is important because you need to train like you fight, and many fights go to the ground.
I wouldn't use explosive or noisy simulation ammo in the house.
Your best shot is usually going to be that first cold shot. Thats all your going to get from laser training.
You need to go the range and practice real follow up shots.
The laser training will help you learn point shooting and your trigger.

The down side of this system is if you are training for revolver, you need 5 or 6 of them $$$.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That laserlyte is COOL. But yeah. Spendy. Will have to wait and invest in something like that when I really narrow down what I am most comfortable using as an edc the majority of the year.
 

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Most centerfire guns do not need snapcaps. Dry firing is OK. But not all. A good example is the Keltec PF9. Repeated dryfiring without snapcaps, will damage the firing pin retention screw. Not expensive to fix (it's just a screw), but if damaged it can be difficult to get out.

Rimfire needs snapcaps. Some rimfire guns may have a cutout in the breech to negate the need for snapcaps, but it's besst to just generally assume that all rimfires should use snapcaps. Rimfire snapcaps do not last long before they self destruct. And rimfire "action proving rounds" are even less durable.

I do not use "snapcaps" per se. I use drywall anchors. The last much longer and are so cheap as to be inconsequential in cost. Get the #4-8 x 7/8 in ones. They extract just fine which is a bonus. Feeding from a magazine by manually cycling the slide is hit of miss. You may have to manually insert them into the chamber. But once in the chamber, they are good for repeated use. To keep using the same one, just rotate it in the chamber a few degrees every so often.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Crown-B...bed-Plastic-Anchors-100-Piece-54772/100338197

Another option to practice at home is with a pellet gun. You can get some really nice ones with good triggers (and some really bad ones with horrendous triggers). even a BB gun may suffice. I have a "Remington RAC 1911" BB pistol that is a clone of a real 1911 in weight and feel, and it has a reasonable trigger. You're not going to be shooting accurately at 25 yards with it, but up close it's pretty good. And you get to practice trigger control, breathing control, etc.

This this post I did here on KTOG a few years back regarding pellet/BB gun shooting at home:

https://www.thektog.org/threads/for...ccess-to-a-shooting-range.263408/#post2346749
Beat me to nearly all of it.

I wrote an article about practicing with pellet pistols.

https://www.hipointfirearmsforums.com/articles/inexpensive-training-at-home-with-the-gamo-p25.119/

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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Im a big J-frame fan. My daily carry is a M42 with a Desantis hip grip and a Lasermax Centerfire green laser. I didn't find the laser very useful but I like the support and profile for deep pocket carry. I will replace the laser with the flash light version. I may go back to the Barami grip,
A small frame revolver is strictly an up-close weapon, and even that does require practice. Yes, you can miss a man sized target at ten feet.
Ill say this then Ill shut my pie-hole: the only gun that will protect you is the one in your hand when you need it. So all these fancy carry rigs and hidden pocket purses, fanny packs and coats are useless IMHO. You must be aware of danger in your surroundings and have the weapon ready. A small revolver is a great gun to develop those habits with and will get the job done when needed. As you develop your technique, you may upgrade to higher capacity autos and adjust your carry techniques. I carry a med auto all day in a holster but the M42 is so comfortable its my main carry any other time. I just haven't changed. Its the perfect go everywhere gun.
 

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Wax bullets are typically "loaded" inset below the case mouth. This will almost always fail to feed in a semi-auto, even when hand-cycling. The bullet at SAAMI minimum COAL is required to feed the cartridge from the magazine, up the feed ramp, and into the chamber. The only "consistent" option would be to load directly into the chamber and then let the slide slam home and the extractor jumping over the rim/extractor groove. That's freaking hard on the extractor and will, over time, break it.

Revolvers, on the other hand, are prime candidates for wax bullets.

I recall reading of someone who was experimenting with using his bullet casting molds to "cast" bullets using soft/low-temp hot glue. No idea if it worked but, if it did, then he would get "bullets" which could be loaded into a cartridge and might feed properly.

On an interesting historic side-note, there was a revival of the Pistol Dueling tradition in the early 20th Century referred to as "Bloodless Dueling." It used traditional single-shot, muzzle loaded, "cap-and-ball" pistols with a wax ball, cap, but no powder. The Duelists wore helmets similar to fencing masks, heavy fabric long coats, and the pistols were equipped with steel cups or bells to protect the pistol hand, similar to that on a dueling sabre.



Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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When I made my wax boolets, i just sized and primed cases then pushed them into a block of parafin. They worked, but I was underwelmed.
Wax can wax the barrel, I would caution agin glue bullets for the same reason.
The modern bloodless dual woul be paintball, me thinks.
Lop
 
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