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Why would you prefer a single tube? Being lighter is the only benefit I can think of.
I want a KSG-S (single tube) in addition to the KSG, not in lieu of the KSG.

Some times you feel like 2 tubes,
sometimes you don't...
KSG has two,
KSG-S don't...

Why?

Lighter, could be narrower, simpler, potentially more reliable, & should be less expensive.

That said, the best reason of all is I want one. :)
 

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Your last reason has always been good enough for me to justify a new firearm.

I will admit that I would like to see concept drawings at least. Another advantage would be easier reloads, I would think anyway.
 

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I think they would sale quite well. Lighter cheaper and in all likelihood more reliable, simpler. Take it one step farther and make it a 20 gauge and call it the roommate, the demand might well exceed that of the KSG.
 

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Yes, you would have easier in-line reloads, but half the capacity. It's easier to flip the switch than to reload even the simplest magtube. The KSG is already very light for what it is, yeah one less steel magtube would cut more weight, but with a little more felt recoil. I guess some what justify being able to put more unnecessary tacticool stuff on it.
Though like mentioned above, it would be still unique with it's built from the ground up bullpup configuration. I just wish they would include more steel reinforcement into their polymer in the critical points such as the foreend grip area and lower grips front tabs that holds it into the magtube.
 

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I would be quite content if it ejected a spent case and loaded the next shell reliably with one normal pump;)
True, the pump action is not as graceful as it could be. They would still have this problem if making a single magtube design, unless they changed the mechanism involved making it more smooth like the Mossberg or Remington pumps.
 

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I would be quite content if it ejected a spent case and loaded the next shell reliably with one normal pump
Both(Gen 1 and Gen 2) I've owned have worked well
 

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I also never disassembled either one. I often wonder how many have issues cause they like to see how the gun works but don't put them back together just right? I know when I was younger and bought a new car, I took a lot of it apart just to see how it was put together.
 

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I also never disassembled either one. I often wonder how many have issues cause they like to see how the gun works but don't put them back together just right? I know when I was younger and bought a new car, I took a lot of it apart just to see how it was put together.
You may be right in some cases. Pity is so many are driven to disassemble the weapon beyond what is needed to do a standard cleaning just trying to make it work:rolleyes:
Thought we would be seeing a lot of these guns in squad cars by now. Neat package, has so much going for it other than not being reliable enough to be counted on in a serious situation. Until Kel Tec gets their act together it is not going to happen. It will remain a range toy and conversation piece.
I have made mine better, not good but better, with a polish job to the chamber. I suspect some of the parts were stressed during the time I used it with the rough chamber, forcing them out of tolerance??????? Any suggestions before I box her up and send her to south Florida. First time in over 40 years having to send a gun back to the hatchery in the hopes of it actually functioning reliably.
 

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I think it is an odd(unique) design. I just clean what I can see and it seems to work. Maybe someday I'll disassemble it....Good luck with sending it back to the mother ship!!
 

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I also never disassembled either one. I often wonder how many have issues cause they like to see how the gun works but don't put them back together just right? I know when I was younger and bought a new car, I took a lot of it apart just to see how it was put together.
First post at KTOG...I am guilty as charged on disassembling firearms beyond necessary...however, now I only attempt this while in possession and AFTER reading a factory manual...emphasis on after having read...:D...I am an incorrigible stem twister. One of my oldest memories is disassembling an old wind-up alarm clock, down to a pile of gears, then trying to put it back together. I got it together, but alas, it never quite worked right...life lesson in there somewhere, I am quite sure. As to the OP, I would totally be in for a single tube KSG-S, for backpacking bear medicine. The KSG is fairly bulky...not terribly long (even with a Silencerco Salvo mounted)but rather ...chunky...:cool:
 

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First post at KTOG...I am guilty as charged on disassembling firearms beyond necessary...however, now I only attempt this while in possession and AFTER reading a factory manual...emphasis on after having read...:D...I am an incorrigible stem twister. One of my oldest memories is disassembling an old wind-up alarm clock, down to a pile of gears, then trying to put it back together. I got it together, but alas, it never quite worked right...life lesson in there somewhere, I am quite sure. As to the OP, I would totally be in for a single tube KSG-S, for backpacking bear medicine. The KSG is fairly bulky...not terribly long (even with a Silencerco Salvo mounted)but rather ...chunky...:cool:
 

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KS7, and 12 gauge not 20 because you can stoke it with 12 gauge minishells but they don't make(yet ) mini-shells in 20 gauge. I heard Aguila was coming out with them but so far no sign.
 

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One of my oldest memories is disassembling an old wind-up alarm clock, down to a pile of gears, then trying to put it back together. I got it together, but alas, it never quite worked right...
Oh man.... that brought back memories for me too. When I was a kid, I musta been 8 or so, my dad had a very loud alarm clock - Westclox Big Ben. It had a brass stem on the back for setting time of day, another to set the time the alarm was to ring. And it had two keys, one to wind the mainspring, the other to wind the alarm spring. And... a little slider behind a siding door for +/- on the time of day, and as I recall (maybe) a slider for the loudness of the alarm. Not sure on that, because I may be getting it confused with the one I eventually got, which was a later model.

Anyway... the Big Ben crapped out one day, and my father tried to have a look inside. You had to unscrew the keys from their shafts, and there were a few not overly small screws that held the rear cover on. He couldn't get it to work, put the cover back on and pitched it in the trash. Next day, he had a new one he got from E.J.Korvette or a store like 'em, up in LINY.

So.... I dug down into the old coffee grounds and such, and dragged out the food covered alarm clock, rinsed it in the sink, and snuck it into my room. Similarly, I rummaged a few small screwdrivers and eventually some pliers from dads "workshop" in the basement. I had it apart, down to the last gear, and back together. And... (love it) I found the alarm spring had broken off its shaft, so I just filed a bit to make a new end and bent it like the original.

The damn thing worked perfectly. Ran well. And on Monday morning, I was up for school ... this was 2nd grade, so how old was I?... and dad "discovered" his old alarm clock, free from tuna juice, coffee grounds and mac-n-cheeze leftovers, _and_ working. He beat me silly, yelled and hollered about taking something he threw out and having my way with it, and confiscated the repaired alarm. That was the last I ever saw of it.

Mom got me one, against dad's say-so, for my next birthday, and I kept it till I was married, which was about 40 years ago or so.

Those clocks were a marvel of American crap manufacturing, with "bent tabs" holding the works together inside, and crude stamped from sheet metal gears and such. And even a 2nd grader could fix 'em, that's how simple they were.

Dad was funny about his kid showin' him up, cuz I got that same beating for repairing the dead lawnmower (magneto wire) and wiring on the trailer hitch (bad ground). I think I was 13 for the lawnmower, and 14 for the trailer hitch. He was a real ACE of a carpenter (not by trade) having worked building houses as a teen and young man, and I learned a lot from him on that, but mechanical stuff... wiring... not overly adept I guess.

Anyway, thanks for joggin' that story outta my brain's innards.
 

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That was a nice story. :) I remember Big Been clocks, & hearing how another lad likely began his tinkering which led into "discovery" & repair, of anything, is enjoyable. I can relate to those days in the workshop in the farm when weather basically kept us inside after the chores were done. Several hours spent in the shop, exploring. Thanks for sharing.
 
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