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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I shot the Savage Model 11 Scout rifle today. They had one as a rental at my range today, my lifetime membership gives me free rentals, so why not.

It was a nice rifle. Good solid feel. Fit me well. I put 20 rounds through it. Even though rentals are free for me, I have to use, and purchase, their range ammo to use in the rentals. They charge $30 for a box of 20 .308, which I thought was a high price, but then I don't own a .308 currently and don't know what ammo for it costs these days.

Pros:

The trigger. Very light, crisp, no complaints about it what-so-ever. Actually, only compliments about it. Good job Savage.

Recoil. Waiiittt. I thought this thing was a .308? What's it doing recoiling more like a .243? Hmm. This thing didn't kick much at all. Could be the thick cushy recoil pad. Could be the muzzle brake that comes standard on it. This is a .308 you could shoot all day. Not that .308's are all that big of a kicker, but this one felt very light recoiling for this caliber.

Adjustable cheek rest. I didn't adjust it (this was a rental gun), but it's a nice feature to have.

The sights. It comes with a rear aperture sight, which I think is much better than a notch sight.

The bolt. Feels solid. Doesn't wobble around like on many rifles. Not up to my Howa in quality feel, but still pretty good none the less.

The stock. While plastic, if felt very solid, not hollow and cheap like on many rifles. The tan color was a nice change from the typical black plastic.

Comes with a threaded barrel and muzzle brake.

Cons:

The external 10 round magazine seemed a bit finicky. It was difficult to get seated fully. You have to smack it pretty good. Sometimes when you think you have it seated, you don't ... the bolt will fail to strip a round off the top. This may be user error on my part. Possibly I was trying to be too gentle with the thing.

The mag release. Too small and up front. Or course you can change magazines with it, but not very quickly. Needs to be larger.

The bolt. Yes, the bolt was both a pro and a con. The con part of it is that you don't want to baby it. Open it with reasonable force, close it with reasonable force. Just like you would with a lever action rifle. Trying to move it slowly when it's handling a live round or empty case doesn't work too well. Operate it like a man and it works fine though. It's not terrible, like a Mosin, where you need a 2x4 to whack the bolt with. But it's not butter soft, operate with two fingers, like my Howa (however, that Howa is .223, so not really fair to compare to .308).

Muzzle blast. Not a problem for the shooter. But people standing to your sides will surely notice with that muzzle brake in place. But that's the nature of muzzle brakes.

Unknown:

It comes with a forward mounted scope rail - scout style. There was not a scope mounted on this rental, so I don't know how I'd like the scout style compared to traditional scope mounting. I can't recall if the receiver was drilled/tapped for traditional scope mounting. I'll bet it was, but that is something I forgot to check.

Overall:

It was a good gun. I think I might go ahead and buy one. Been thinking about it for a while.

http://www.savagearms.com/firearms/model/11Scout
 

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haertig,

You haven't by chance shot a Ruger GSR, have you? Very curious to compare the two or at least talk to someone who has shot them both. Thank you.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You haven't by chance shot a Ruger GSR, have you?
I have not, sorry. They are reportedly nice rifles,but I have never shot one. the closest I've come is handling one at our local Cabela's store. It felt nice in the hand. However, the magazine stuck out very far from the bottom of the gun and was an aesthetic turn-off to me. But I think those magazines come in different sizes, and I don't know which one was installed in the GSR I handled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Accuracy???
I can't really comment on that. I was shooting with it's open sights using my distance prescription glasses. Which means "I couldn't see the front sight". I had all 20 shots in a 3 inch circle at 25 yards. But I'm sure the gun is MUCH more capable than that. The problem is, when you can't even see the front sight, when it's just the faintest of unrecognizable blurs, you really can't expect to hit anything. I would need to try the rifle again, with my piano glasses this time, which give me a sharp front sight picture (but even at 25 yards, with my piano glasses on, the target is a blurry). Still, with a sharp front sight and a blurry target, you can hit pretty well. At least I can. I had neglected to take my piano glasses on this shooting trip (i usually take them) because I was mostly planning on shooting my SW22 Victory pistol, which has a red-dot sight that works just fine with my distance prescription glasses.
 

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I shot the Savage Model 11 Scout rifle today. They had one as a rental at my range today, my lifetime membership gives me free rentals, so why not.

It was a nice rifle. Good solid feel. Fit me well. I put 20 rounds through it. Even though rentals are free for me, I have to use, and purchase, their range ammo to use in the rentals. They charge $30 for a box of 20 .308, which I thought was a high price, but then I don't own a .308 currently and don't know what ammo for it costs these days.

Pros:

The trigger. Very light, crisp, no complaints about it what-so-ever. Actually, only compliments about it. Good job Savage.

Recoil. Waiiittt. I thought this thing was a .308? What's it doing recoiling more like a .243? Hmm. This thing didn't kick much at all. Could be the thick cushy recoil pad. Could be the muzzle brake that comes standard on it. This is a .308 you could shoot all day. Not that .308's are all that big of a kicker, but this one felt very light recoiling for this caliber.

Adjustable cheek rest. I didn't adjust it (this was a rental gun), but it's a nice feature to have.

The sights. It comes with a rear aperture sight, which I think is much better than a notch sight.

The bolt. Feels solid. Doesn't wobble around like on many rifles. Not up to my Howa in quality feel, but still pretty good none the less.

The stock. While plastic, if felt very solid, not hollow and cheap like on many rifles. The tan color was a nice change from the typical black plastic.

Comes with a threaded barrel and muzzle brake.

Cons:

The external 10 round magazine seemed a bit finicky. It was difficult to get seated fully. You have to smack it pretty good. Sometimes when you think you have it seated, you don't ... the bolt will fail to strip a round off the top. This may be user error on my part. Possibly I was trying to be too gentle with the thing.

The mag release. Too small and up front. Or course you can change magazines with it, but not very quickly. Needs to be larger.

The bolt. Yes, the bolt was both a pro and a con. The con part of it is that you don't want to baby it. Open it with reasonable force, close it with reasonable force. Just like you would with a lever action rifle. Trying to move it slowly when it's handling a live round or empty case doesn't work too well. Operate it like a man and it works fine though. It's not terrible, like a Mosin, where you need a 2x4 to whack the bolt with. But it's not butter soft, operate with two fingers, like my Howa (however, that Howa is .223, so not really fair to compare to .308).

Muzzle blast. Not a problem for the shooter. But people standing to your sides will surely notice with that muzzle brake in place. But that's the nature of muzzle brakes.

Unknown:

It comes with a forward mounted scope rail - scout style. There was not a scope mounted on this rental, so I don't know how I'd like the scout style compared to traditional scope mounting. I can't recall if the receiver was drilled/tapped for traditional scope mounting. I'll bet it was, but that is something I forgot to check.

Overall:

It was a good gun. I think I might go ahead and buy one. Been thinking about it for a while.

http://www.savagearms.com/firearms/model/11Scout
It is a tactical type do everything fairly well but not specialize in anything rifle ala Col. Jeff Cooper. For pure hunting at longer ranges the rear mounted scope would be an advantage, but you would be wasting all of the other attributes. The scout scope works extremely well at all ranges, and if you use one with a 1 or 2 power by whatever variable, you can shoot at close range with both eyes open just like a pistol. It also leaves the chamber open for clearing jams or topping off the magazine. All Savages in the last 20 years are the best bang for the buck, and dead accurate. Savage also was the one to get the rest of the industry off their rusty dusties and put decent triggers on production rifles. If you are not a scout scope fan, you might look at the model 10. It has many of the same features with no sights and a picatinny rail mounted on the receiver. It also costs less. The Savage was what I was contemplating before I built my .308 Spanish Mauser carbine with a scout scope and reworked the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The one thing I noted, is that you can't top off the magazine while it's inserted in the rifle. At least I couldn't figure out how to - I tried. The lips of the magazine are more like a pistol, where you insert the rounds from the front and then slide them to the back. You don't push the rounds straight down like in a rifle having an internal magazine. And I had a lot of trouble seating the magazine in the rifle. It's much easier to seat with the bolt open. I'll have to play with the rifle some more. The magazine set up was the most concerning part of this gun. Maybe I just didn't know how to use it properly. I only have two external magazine centerfire rifles - an AK and an AR, so my experience with centerfire removable mag rifles is limited.
 

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The rear sight and the back of the scout scope mount are in the traditional Savage receiver scope base mounting holes. I am a big fan of Savage rifles and the scout concept but for my preferences I will not be getting this rifle. For me they should have left off the cheek rest and the muzzle brake and started with a lighter action. When I build my Scout rifle I'll be starting with a Savage 16 Lightweight hunter and adding sights and a forward rail.
 

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And I had a lot of trouble seating the magazine in the rifle. It's much easier to seat with the bolt open. I'll have to play with the rifle some more. The magazine set up was the most concerning part of this gun. Maybe I just didn't know how to use it properly. I only have two external magazine centerfire rifles - an AK and an AR, so my experience with centerfire removable mag rifles is limited.
Unless they have had a production change, there is a method that works well. As you noted, the mag release is forward and releases the front of the mag first. The mag is designed to lock on the front last when inserting. Tip the front of the mag slightly downward when inserting and hook the top rear of the mag in the well, and then rotate the mag up and forward to lock the front on the release catch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK, I'll try that next time (don't know when that might be though). Sounds like an AK mag insert (except reversed - with an AK you lock the front of the mag in first, then rotate the back in).
 

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Thanks for the details on it, I have been eying this exact model for a while.

Any idea what spare mags run? I was not able to find them on Savage's site.
 
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