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Had a great time - cost for the match + ammo + gas to get there was right at $50. Had 6 Stages, took 6 hours + registration time, so that is less then $10/hr for a fun time.

Used a S&W SD9 in SSP (Stock Service Pistol) Division

Some things I learned that were not in the online videos & posts

Reloads - I had this one messed up in my head. There is a rule which says you can not fire your magazine empty to make a reload tactically advantageous for you the shooter. Example - SSP means 11 in the gun at start - if you have 3 targets each getting 3 shots - that is 9, well now you have 2 in the gun. Before you engage T4 with 3 shots, it would be to your advantage to have reloaded. You would not be allowed to fire 2 extra shots to get to slide lock. As a result I was thinking I had to shoot to slide lock, then reload. That is not in the rules -- it could be in a given stage, however.

When reviewing the stage sheet, you will see where you are allowed to reload and where you have to reload. If you have a spot where you are allowed, you can reload as long as you retain the magazine. If you are at slide lock, you are allowed to drop the magazine to the deck - you do not have to retain it.

This is a big deal of course - It came to us on one stage where at least 3 people got sent home for unsafe gun handling!

Like in my example, they had T4 set at 9 o'clock - really close to 180 line you may be familiar with. Well if you hit slide lock and then do a reload an you already facing 9 - where does your muzzle go during your reload? I have a tendency to kant mine about 11 o'clock. If I am facing 9, and kant 1 clock that is 8 o'clock, which is bad news! But by reloading with retention (or a tactical reload) after T3 where I am not facing the edge of the range, I had no worries about being 'just over' the safe zone. I am grateful to another competitor who suggested that to me.

So while it is against the rules to "Air Gun," you can and should mentally play out the stage and plan where to do your reloads.

Another competitor also suggested that you always retain the mag, rather than dropping it. Do it the same way each time. And as my SD mags run $65 each! I don't really want to drop them anyway.

2nd, Shooting the targets. Most threat targets are Keep The Best of X.
I was thinking that you had to shoot only the number of times allowed, but could keep shooting if you missed. If you needed 2 there better be exactly 2 holes in the target. I was wrong, that cost me some points.

So, typically you get best 2 or best 3. If you want to shoot the target 7 times, that is OK. You are trading time for points* And having enough bullets to finish the stage. There is a rule that you get a penalty if you "Fail to Neutralize" the threat, that is not enough points, er um too many points off.

On some stages you cannot shoot extra, the S.O. should stress that.

3rd, we had 30 new shooters at our safety orientation! That is fantastic.

4th. Since we live in a PC time of can't do this, can't do that, I was surprised by how many shooters were lighting up stogies.

Holy crap 10mm are loud. So are XD-M's.

5th - Capacity. This was not clear to me from the rule book, and all I kept hearing was fill to capacity and have a 4th mag to top off and ... fuzzy.

For SSP you fill up your first mag to 11, put it in a pocket, fill up your 2nd & 3rd mags to 10 and put in the pouch. Simple.

For those who shoot with less in the mags, like say a PF-9, a revolver or an 1911, or if you live in The Peoples Republic of X - it sucks to be you. You'll have to ask someone else what is the best practice.

6th - and this is a question - This range, Tri-County in Sherwood OR, does not allow concealed carry - in places other than the shooting bay's. So, you can't be carrying as you drive onto the property. When I am traveling with my weapons, my paranoia creeps upwards and I don't want to going without carrying. (yes I am legal for where I reside)

Stripping down on the side of a highway doesn't make sense - stripping in restaurant / gas station before I get there also doesn't seem like a best practice to me.

Any suggestions?


Oh, and bring a stool, chair or a bucket to sit on.



* In IDPA it is points off - "negative scoring" really --
-0 is good, -1 not bad, -3 is bad, -5 if you miss (and if you have too few of the -1 and -0 you can also get a procedural Failure to Neutralize. You keep the "best" of the shots you make If you need 3 shots and you shoot a -3, a -3 and a -1, you need to shoot at least another -1 to cancel out the worst shot so far.
http://www.pmrpcidpa.com/documents/IDPA_Scoring.pdf
 

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Sounds like fun. I've never shot IDPA, but I've shot quite a few USPSA events. Other than the Louisiana heat, I've always had a good time.
 

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Great info. Just shot my first USPSA style shoot last week and the combination of rules, stage sequence and speed at which the, "clear, lock, check, mmm, yak, etc.," is given made it hard. It doesn't help that I can't hear crap normally let alone with my hearing protection on. Didn't get DQ'd, but there was about 7 newbies to one old hand RSO and he was very nice and very edifying. We were lucky to draw him.

I am more interested in IDPA style shooting than USPSA, but maybe I'll stick where I'm at for now:).

happy shooting, dv
 

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what you are hearing is load to division capacity. Which IIRC is 10 for most divisions, 8 for 1911 red headed step child division, 6 for backup gun division, 6 for revolvers, but you can find it in your rule book.

You can wear a gunbelt, holster, and all in a no-carry state. Just don't have the gun in them! Wear your gear, drop the gun in when you arrive on site. Travel the usual... unloaded, ammo far from the gun, etc.

ammo management is a big part of the sport. Some people load so they are empty at certain parts of the stage. Some always keep the mag. Fail to neutralize is overly complex... again from memory --- I think you need 2 in a target anywhere, OR 1 in a zero ring. Less than that is a FTN.

Typically its better to be fast than good. The zero rings are huge, and -1 for missing THOSE is small compared to reshooting or taking time to aim. A quick bad shot that is -1 or even -2 is better than an aimed headshot that took 6 seconds to do.... its all about the speed.

Too many rules... you cannot use this holster, you cannot use this caliber, you cannot use this belt, you cannot pocket carry, you cannot drop a mag, you have to shoot in this order, on and on it goes. 180 degree danger zone from the guns. No cross draw. Open carry with a shirt over it is the only allowed carry. It has so many rules its hard to concentrate on the actual shooting or to relax. And if its at place that takes it seriously, they WILL rule monger you. So my advice is to read that rule book about 20 times a month for the first 3 months.
 
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