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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all, I am glad that I found this website. I have spent the last 2 hours browsing the site and the forums. I feel a bit overwhelmed with all the information available, but I am sure it will digest over time.

Anyway, I picked up a new Kel-Tec P3AT (2nd Gen) with the chrome slide. Very nice! I put about 30 rounds through it as soon as I purchased it from my local indoor shooting range. I also fired about 12 rounds or so of the Speer Gold Dot .380 ammo that I plan to carry for personal defense once I obtain my CCW. I didn't have any jams or problems.

Right away I noticed that it didn't fit my hand very well so I ordered the 1 round magazine extender and an extra mag. I remove the original bottom plate and spring and replaced it with the extender that came from Kel-Tec. It makes for a much better fit now although I like the look of the Bersa/NAA thingey that's shown in "Wilson" 's forum picture.

Next, my problem. Now I am not sure that it is related to the magazine extension, insufficient lubrication on the "feed ramp" or "hammer interface" if I am getting the lingo right (forgive my lack of knowledge in this area), or maybe failing to "slingshot" the slide -- but the Gold Dot rounds are not loading into the barrel correctly -- they are jamming almost perfectly horizonal pinned between the "feed ramp" and the "breech face" (again, if I am getting the lingo right).

The wadcutters that I use for target practice load just fine so I assume it is not the magazine extension. I realize there are a couple of other posts (about similar problems) to this referencing break-in period, half-cocked hammers, frankenbolts, and fluffs and buffs (again, waiting for all the info to digest), so I am really not sure what I should do first! ???

The idea of firing another box or two of wadcutters is frightening at best with the jamming to break it in further, but the horrible nightmare referenced in a previous post:



(although I think that was related to a round stuck in the barrel, not a jamming hollowpoint ::) ) scares the crap out of me.

I have also considered performing the "fluff and buff" as shown in the tecworks part of the website, but I am worried that I will screw something up :p

Anyway, perhaps I am over-reacting to all this info, but I would like to end up with a functional, reliable weapon for CCW should I ever (God forbid) need it as well as save on humongous gunsmith fees. Any suggestions would be MOST helpful...

Walter
 

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How the Gold Dot rounds chamber during hand feeding prpbably has NO relation to how they feed during ACTUAL firing.

Yes, you must "slingshot" the slide and not ride it forward. Also, this gun has not even BEGUN to break in yet.

You are not likely to have a kaboom unless you are attempting to shoot ultra hot ammo loads like the Glaser, or shoot a squib ( under powered round that just makes a faint pop and the bullet lodges in the barrel) and then fire another round into that one. Plugged barrels DO tend to split when fired.

Packer.
 

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Welcome Walter.  Are you "sling shotting" the slide?  That is pull it back and let it slip out of your fingers.  Also when a round hangs up will a gentle tap on the back of the slide cause it to go on into battery?

If the answer to the second question (tap on the back) is yes then you are probably good to go.  These little guys are right at the edge of the performance envelope.  My P3 if not "sling shotted" will hang like that.  But it cycles just fine when fired.

A little of that pink oil on the feed ramp works wonders.

To swipe a phrase (from jocko); "shoot it like you stole it"
 

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Walter,
In my case, I was fortunate to find this site before purchasing my chrome P3AT a couple of weeks ago, and used advice I picked up here to prepare the handgun before taking it to the range for the first time. I pulled down & printed a couple of different Fluff & Buff instructions with pictures. Performing a simple F&B on the parts marked as critical was pretty simple. I found on my gun that the metal was basically good, and did not require a lot of work with the 400 grit sand paper. Just a bit of work on the feed ramp and on the slide in the rail area to knock off sharp corners that rub against each other. Most of my time was polishing with a Dremmel and polish compound on a felt tip. Feed Ramp, Chamber and in the barrel hood above the fed ramp. Also polish the hammer surface. Real easy to bring it all up to a high polished surface. The payback was 200 perfect feeds on the first time out. Not any cleaning done until I finished up at the range. I had one round that did not fire, but I think it was caused by me failing to do a good "slingshot" release after I put a new magazine in after racking the slide. The barrell must not have locked up fully. Lubricate properly after you finish up. For my opinion I would definately advise spending the time on the F&B.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Two Pistol Packer said:
  Yes, you must "slingshot" the slide and not ride it forward. Also, this gun has not even BEGUN to break in yet.

Packer.
Well, as expected, anything new takes some practice. It's like night and day vs. my Ruger P94 compared to the Kel-Tec. It's all in the slide action I guess. I pulled the slide all the way back and let it snap and no problems whatsoever with the Gold Dots. I chambered 7 rounds from each of my magazines, extenders attached, and they loaded perfectly! Thanks a lot!

How many rounds would you say qualifies as "broke in" because I just got paid and the range is calling my name! ;D

Total Kel-tec Noob,

Walter
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
SnapCap said:
For my opinion I would definately advise spending the time on the F&B.
Is this your first Kel-tec as well? Also, have you had any experience doing this "fluff & buff" procedure previously? I'm just trying to gauge what level of experience (compared to me) that you had before attempting this.

Speaking of payday in my previous reply, I have always wanted to buy a dremel tool set! *hears the beeping of the cash register at the store* ;D


Total Kel-Tec Noob,

Walter
 

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Break in varys from opinion to opinion. Most consider 200-300 perfect rounds as good to go. Some only feel comfortable with 2000. In any case, if you have a malfunction then the count starts over at zero.

You don't have to have a Dremel, though it certainly makes it easier. Most of the F & B consists of polishing the feed ramp of the barrel that the bullet nose rides up when feeding.

This can be polished very well and inexpensively woth a couple of sheets of first 180, then 400, then 600 wet or dry sandpaper.

The rest of the F & B is just looking for potential rough spots or burrs in the slide. (Never sand the aluminum frame.)

Packer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Two Pistol Packer said:
  Break in varys from opinion to opinion. Most consider 200-300 perfect rounds as good to go. Some only feel comfortable with 2000.  In any case, if you have a malfunction then the count starts over at zero.

  You don't have to have a Dremel, though it certainly makes it easier. Most of the F & B consists of polishing the feed ramp of the barrel that the bullet nose rides up when feeding.

  This can be polished very well and inexpensively woth a couple of sheets of first 180, then 400, then 600 wet or dry sandpaper.

  The rest of the F & B is just looking for potential rough spots or burrs in the slide. (Never sand the aluminum frame.)

Packer.
Thanks for re-posting that information. If I had read the "Break-in vs Break Down" thread before replying, I wouldn't have asked. Remind me to read any new topics or topics with new replies before I ask a question! :D No one like repeating themselves.

Total Kel-Tec Noob,

Walter
 
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