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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used +P ammo in the P3AT? I am just wondering if it is safe to use in the little guy. I know KT says that +P is o.k. in the PF-9, but I am not sure about the P3AT.....
 

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Look in your owners manual!

AMMUNITION: The P-3AT Pistol is designed and chambered for the .380 Auto cartridge. Do not use any other ammuntion. The P-3AT will accept +P ammuntion, however not with continuous use.

Only problem is - there is no such ammo to buy.

Even the few that claim +P (in a 380 ACP) are just blowing smoke. They are no more powerful than standard loads.

The P-3AT is rated for UP TO 250 foot pounds at the muzzel - most loads are somewhere between 180-200. I would like to see someone put the Barnes copper bullet on a cartridge but use a 90 gr bullet (DPX uses 80gr) and push it out at about 1,200-1,250 fps - and get get maybe 225-230 foot pounds. Since this is my dream - I might as well also ask for them to sell for $5.00 (box of 50).
 
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my bet is that corbon did alot of testing with different weight barnes bullets and found the 800 grain the best , FWIW IMO I don't think they just pulled that weight out of the air and they did all their testing of the dpx with the kt 380, so IMO this bullet is the best bullet and load for kt 380, any other 380 is debatable...
 

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jocko

Heavy and fast - VS - light and slow

I can understand the debate when its fast and light VS heavy and slow - but have a harder time seeing the downside to a faster AND heavier bullet.

Unless it is hard to handle the recoil - getting a fast (accurate) second shot - even one with less power could be much more important - but I would sure like to shoot a few rounds of super 380 ACP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I ordered a HC P3AT, but it will not be here until probably Friday s I do not have the owners manual yet. I tried d-loading it from the KT website, but my comp. is having problems d-loading pdf files or some reason.
 

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z71bill said:
I would like to see someone put the Barnes copper bullet on a cartridge  but use a 90 gr bullet (DPX uses 80gr) and push it out at about 1,200-1,250 fps - and get get maybe 225-230 foot pounds.
IMHO: That ain't gonna happen.

The limiting factor with the .380 ACP is case strength, and the untold numbers of very old, and also very new, blow-back operated pistols already out there.

Nobody in their right mind would attempt to make a heavy-bullet 9mm Lite out of the .380 ACP.

You can thank Corbon for the very good DPX load they have now, but don't look for any more performance then that to come out based on the .380 ACP case design.


rcmodel
 
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+1 on that. liability liability liability. #1 with any firearm company. If you want a hotter 380, step up to a 9mm, ...
 

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Is 90 gr really a heavy bullet weight (for a 380)?

Seems like it is about average.

You have the 70gr powerball at one end and the 102gr (I think) GS at the other. But most bullet weights seem to be between 85 and 95. With 90 gr actually being very common.

It could be true - no major ammo company will ever develop a cartridge that pushes the limit of the P-3AT - could be the market for such a round is not worth their time and effort (and risk). But then -just about every major ammo manufacturer produces other calibers that are higher power +P+ loads in 9MM and 45 ACP - so if the market is large enough they will take the risk.

BTW - I always thought that the 380 was developed based off the 9MM - so it is a 9mm light.

9MM Kurtz is German for 9MM short. Sort of like the development of the 40 S&W - which is a 10mm "short".

Or - was the 9MM developed based off the 380 - like the 357 mag was from the 38 special?

Chicken or egg?
 
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IMO most all 9's are heavier built for the +p round. more frame material etc, just can't do that with these small 380 frames. You sure don't hear anything about the 102 grain bullet, so it must be a non issue with most. They just don'tshoot it, not even sure how and if it would work in the present kt380's. It certainly is heavier but I seriously doubt you will see any expansion from it. I'm not a corbon sale person but presently I think it is by far the best rond out there for the kt380. expansion is just super-every time to..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, thanks for all the input. I am not trying to make it a 9mm, I just want to get the most out of it. I just ordered a PF-9 also, so that will be my 9mm. Right now I carry a G23 (my duty weapon is a G22), but sometimes it is just too big.
 

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kies277 said:
Well, thanks for all the input.  I am not trying to make it a 9mm, I just want to get the most out of it.  I just ordered a PF-9 also, so that will be my 9mm.  Right now I carry a G23 (my duty weapon is a G22), but sometimes it is just too big.
Welcome to KTOG, kies!

Here are some .380 wetpack tests that you might find useful:

Winter/Summer Wetpack Test:

http://www.ktog.org/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=104;action=display;num=1158537757

.22, .32, .380 and 9mm Wetpack Test: (MONSTER)

http://www.ktog.org/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=104;action=display;num=1148670025
P3AT CHEAP AMMO WETPACK TEST

http://www.ktog.org/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=104;action=display;num=1166124717

Packer.
 

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z71bill said:
BTW - I always thought that the 380 was developed based off the 9MM - so it is a 9mm light.
Chicken or egg?
Neither Chicken, or Egg, or a 9mm Lite.

The .380 ACP was developed by John Browning & Colt in 1908. It was later adopted in Europe by FN & Browning in 1912.

It was intended as a step up in power (but not pressure) from the .32 ACP (introduced in 1899) in the small blow-back operated pistols John Browning designed for Colt & FN. (Or perhaps a step down in power from the Browning designed, locked-breach 38 Colt automatic of 1900.)

The 9mm Luger was developed as a high-pressure round, by a German named Georg Luger, in conjunction with the very strong toggle-locked 1902 Luger pistol. (Probably as a step up in power from the .30 Borchart of 1893, and the .30 Luger of 1900.)

As you can see, the only thing they have in common at all is the .355 bore size.


rcmodel
 

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Try and get your hands on some good and hot Santa Barbara 9mm Cortero (short 9) otherwise .380.

My guess if they had a +p rating back in the 70's that the SB would have been it.

I have fired 25+ rounds of this with no problems other than it is dirty, but it's hot!

BTW: I don't think this has been produced since around 1982 so it may take some searching to find some!
 

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Hey, Amigo, How's it going?

  The supply of Santa Barbara, or Empress Nacional, seems to have dried up. I don't know any place that is still selling it.

  But there MAY be some out there.

Packer.
 

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There is also the 9x20mm Browning Long used in an early Browning design blow-back operated pistol. See: http://world.guns.ru/handguns/hg118-e.htm

rcmodel said:
Neither Chicken, or Egg, or a 9mm Lite.

The .380 ACP was developed by John Browning & Colt in 1908. It was later adopted in Europe by FN & Browning in 1912.

It was intended as a step up in power (but not pressure) from the .32 ACP (introduced in 1899) in the small blow-back operated pistols John Browning designed for Colt & FN. (Or perhaps a step down in power from the Browning designed, locked-breach 38 Colt automatic of 1900.)

The 9mm Luger was developed as a high-pressure round, by a German named Georg Luger, in conjunction with the very strong toggle-locked 1902 Luger pistol. (Probably as a step up in power from the .30 Borchart of 1893, and the .30 Luger of 1900.)

As you can see, the only thing they have in common at all is the .355 bore size.


rcmodel
 
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