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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I called Kel-Tec on Friday and told them I had a flat spot on the recoil spring guide - got the part today plus they included a set of recoil springs - got to love this service.

When putting the gun together - it is always a little bit hard to put the recoil spring guide and springs back in - my problem was getting the front part of the spring to compress on the rod - while getting the rod into its little hole - and the other end of the rod into its slot on the barrel - without bending the springs.

So since I now have two rods I fed the old rod through the hole in the slide from the front - and used it as a guide for the springs while installing the new rod. Worked great. It is so much easier to compress the springs while they are being supported by a rod - plus by putting the rods end to end - it made it easy to get rod into the hole on the first try.

I am thinking there must be several other little things P-3AT owners do when taking the gun apart / cleaning it /and putting it back together.

Like using a tooth pick to clean those hard to reach spots - the wood will not damage scratch - like a metal pick would.

So if you have any Tips or tricks to make things easier - post them here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maybe this thread is not such a good idea! :-[

Where do you put your trigger finger when you rack the slide?

I put my trigger finger BEHIND the trigger. The grip is small and I don't want my finger to somehow end up on the trigger. IMO this makes the slide easy to pull back - and 100% safe.

Works for me.
 

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If you file or sand a little chamfer onto the front of the recoil rod, it will go right into the hole.

Filing away the sharp barrel edge in front of the recoil rod socket will stop the flat spots from being cut on the rod head.

Packer.
 

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CHW111 said:
Sounds like a good Idea. 8)
No, it is a good idea. There is alot of good info spread all over this site, but you do need to look for it. Having a "sticky" w/ tips and tricks would keep the redundant questions down.

Here's a few "must do's" IMO:
-A dab of bright paint on front sight w/ some liquid bandage over it. Mines been fine for a year and many holterings.
-Polish the feed ramp. My buddy just got a new P3 and it was noticably not chambering (hand feeding)as smooth as mine which I have polished my feed ramp on. I grabbed my dremel and in about 10 seconds had it smooth as butter. He couldnt believe the difference.
-While you have your dremel out polishing feed ramp, take some of the mag release down so you dont inadvertantly release your mag when you shoot. Only happened to me once, but that was enough. I angled mine so it is higher closer to the trigger and almost flush in the rear where I could hit it when I shoot. I can still easily release it when I want b/c the front is almost as high as it ever was.
-The magwell had a sharp edge that cut into my finger when shooting, so I hit the edge w/ some fine sandpaper. No probs since. I also lightly sanded the whole grip to take care of any sharp edges as well.
All this can be done for about $5 including the price of paint, LB, and sandpaper even if you dont have a Dremel. Makes a great gun even better.

Good thread!
 

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After getting your next Starbuck$ foo foo drink, pick up a few of the wooden coffee stirrers.

Slide them as is .. tight fitting... into the slide grooves to clean or lube.

Angle cut the ends to apply lube, clean or sand hard to reach locations.

Sandpaper or a Dremel can be used to narrow the stirrer somewhat so that it will slide into the slide grooves more easily.

Hemostats, both bent and strait, are useful with the stirrers and other tasks.

I've recently used cloth friction tape under slide on girps to shape and provide tack .. so far it seems to work.
 

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You know, I am a big Dremel tool fan. But, a little crocus cloth, which is amazing fine sandpaper, wrapped around a cylindrical object, like a pencil, and stroked in the direction of the cartridge path, will produce an even more mirror like finish on your feed ramp. Better still you can have all the microscopic ridges going in the right direction.


Polishing the bottom of your slide in the area indicated by the red line, once again with crocus cloth, will, in my opinion, make your P-3AT or P-11 feed more smoothly and reliably, even if the gun is well broken in.

I know this is mostly covered elsewhere, but the message is nothing beats a little hand polishing with crocus cloth.

TucsonMTB . . . who also likes careful lubrication
 
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riverkeeper, any high pressure non cholorinated spray cleaner will clean the grooves in the rails and everything else that one can't get to and dry instantly.
 

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Thanks Jocko--

All my other handguns are revolvers & I had the impression these little fellas were suseptible to accumulated crud inside little teensee weensee places.

So I've generally avoided spraying anything into or onto during primary-initial cleaning with the assumption that could/would move crud into difficult critical places.

CLP products?
 

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Two Pistol Packer said:
  If you file or sand a little chamfer onto the front of the recoil rod, it will go right into the hole.

  Filing away the sharp barrel edge in front of the recoil rod socket will stop the flat spots from being cut on the rod head.

Packer.
Packer, I think I know where you're talking about... but are there pictures in another thread that shows how to file the edge and exactly which edge you're talking about? Also, I'm assuming you're saying that the recoil rod head should be 100% round along the entire circumference??? I notice a flat spot on mine but assumed it was designed that way. Guess I was wrong.
 

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  The barrels used to come like those in the picture. You can see that the front edge is beveled.
So, I guess they have gone back to beveling the sharp edge. That sharp edge can also catch the rod head and allow the gun to be assembled without the guide rod in its socket.

  Either scraping the head along that sharp edge, or the rod slipping off when caught on the edge will cause the flat spots.

  Yes, the rod head should be perfectly round. And, of course, the P3AT should have a steel guide rod.

  Just a little bevel around the tip will make it go into the spring catch easier.

Packer.  
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I just took my gun apart and compared it to the picture - the sharp edge is OBVIOUS NOW.

I also have a trail (the black coating is worn off the barrel) from this sharp edge straight to the knotch where the big end of recoil rod end rests.

It is also OBVIOUIS NOW why the end of my recoil rod was flat.

I took my Dremel and rounded off the sharp egde - plus also smoothed off the trail area.

I can't wait to get back to the range to try it out.

I am not sure if I made the flat spot while putting the gun together or if it happened while shooting - since the sharp edge is gone, and I now use the slave pin method plus just knowing about this potential problem - I will be more careful putting the gun back together - so If the flat spots on the recoil rod come back I can be sure it is as a result of shooting.
 

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As long as you had the sharp edge, both assembling and shooting could cause it.

The only way shooting could cause it is if the rod head was caught in front of the socket and then slipped off over the sharp edge when you shot it.

If you bevel it good, and polish the "trail" neither one will happen again.

Packer.
 

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Took a look at my P3 last nite.  The head of the guide rod has numerous flat spots, some of which exhibit peening.  After looking at the parts I have come to the following conclusions;

The head of the guide rod slides back and forth along the bottom of the barrel between the chamfered edge and the poccket at the rear.

It appears that the flat spots are caused by a combination of wear due to that sliding and being wacked between the barrel and frame when the barrel tilts down at the rear when the slide is all the way back.  This would account for the peening.

This issue probably is just normal wear and does not show up on a P11 due to the polymer rod.

I will start puttin a little grease in this area and possibly polish the track of the guide rod on the bottom of the barrel.

This is just my opinion, but I think this is what is happening.  My gun just got back from Florida a few weeks ago and I have not got to shoot it yet.

It would appear that the factory put more than a few rounds thru it.  This would make sense as it went back for a failure to fire problem.  BTW they replaced the barrel and guide rod.  I know this as my original barrel and rod were polished and the replacements were not.
 

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Two Pistol Packer said:
As long as you had the sharp edge, both assembling and shooting could cause it.

The only way shooting could cause it is if the rod head was caught in front of the socket and then slipped off over the sharp edge when you shot it.

If you bevel it good, and polish the "trail" neither one will happen again.

Packer.
It's amazing what one can learn here.

During an inspection inspired by this thread, I discovered that both my P-3AT's have numerous flat spots at several locations around the edges of their Recoil Spring Guide "heads". There is a noticeable track scraped into the barrel between where I snap the Guide into place during assembly and the front Barrel lug edge on both. :eek:

The chromed barrel has a factory installed bevel and the plain barrel had none . . . orginially.

I guess I must be a little compulsive because I just polished a bevel into the plain barrel with a rubber abrasive wheel. And, I too will apply grease here a bit more consistently. ::)

I should mention that both these guns have hundreds of rounds through them, feel very smooth when hand cycled, and shoot very well.

Here's hoping a little polishing is a good thing in this case.

TucsonMTB . . . who couldn't leave well enough alone :-[
 
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