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Hi all Im a fresh noob. Even tho I have grown up around guns and fired them as a kid, after 30 some odd years of being out of the "gun" environment, I feel like a fresh beginner. I inhereted my Dads KelTec P32 and took a CCW class with that gun. Last weekend I purchased a PF9. I love the look and feel of the gun and today I got to fire it at the range! I did have some issues with FTE but only after I scraped my LH thumb by having it stupidly behind the gun instead of where it should be. I know I wreak of noobness LOL.

One of the folks at the club said I was not getting a good enough grip on the gun thus my FTE issues. However Im going to check that extractor screw now that Ive read a few tips here. I cant wait to go to the range again and get more familier with this gun!

One other issue Im having is a total nervousness while at the range. I dont ever remember being afraid of loud bangs and shooting. But it kind of over-ran me today at the range. Near the end of my session I was pretty shaky. Any tips on how to overcome this would be appreciated.

This seems like a very nice place and Im glad I found the KTOG!

John
 

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Were you having ejection problems or extraction problems? An extraction problem would be the gun leaving an empty casing in the chamber. Ejection would be more like a stove pipe situation with the empty casing not clearing the slide in time and getting "caught".

If your problem was with extraction, some folks have seen that recently (myself included) on their PF9. Most solved this situation by calling KT and having them send you a new extractor, spring, and screw. In some cases that fixes it. In others, doubling of the extractor spring fixes it.

You are right to check your screw and verify that it's tight. Some folks find it loose and once it is secured with loctite they don't have any more trouble.

If you are having an ejection problem it could be due to your grip, but I think it unlikely. I can purposely limp wrist my PF9 and I cannot make it fail. No matter how loosely it is held.

As far as range nervousness? A couple of things. Get used to the weapon. Buy snap caps and practice at home so you are more familiar with the trigger pull. And then, get out there and shoot. Like anything else, practice makes perfect.

Congrats on your PF9. I think you will be glad you bought it.
 

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Thank you! I think mostly I was having ejection issues, however there were a couple of times that the empty casing stayed in the chamber. This is a brand new gun, should I give it some more shooting time to break it in before calling KT?
 

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Yeah I think so. KT recommends around 100 rounds break in I believe. It is not uncommon to have some issues in the initial break in period. If it extends much past that, you may need to work on the gun a bit.

The good news is that if you end up needing to call them - they are fantastic. Couldn't ask for better customer service.
 

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Thank you! I think mostly I was having ejection issues, however there were a couple of times that the empty casing stayed in the chamber. This is a brand new gun, should I give it some more shooting time to break it in before calling KT?
Yes, give it a couple of hundred rounds before you call KT. Also, clean and lube it thoroughly. The PF-9 likes to be clean and well lubed. If the slide is "dry" and dragging, or gunky and dragging, it may not be moving backwards under recoil fast enough to kick the empty brass out. Just one possibility...

Not holding the gun tight enough 'can" contribute to FTE, as well. Just because your wrist is soaking up most of the recoil impulse, and slowing down the slide as it travels. Just one more possibility...
 

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Fail to extract or eject ? Fail to extract is probably extractor spring tention. Failure to eject could be limp wristing.
 

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The recommended break in period for the PF-9 is 200 rounds. For this, you really need to select a quality full metal jacket ammo. Many folks here hav found Remington UMC and Federal ammo to work well in the pF-9. I also get excellent results from PMC Bronze fmj ammo. Avoid the cheap bulk ammo like Winchester White Box and the like. Also strictly avoid steel or aluminum cased ammo in the PF-9. A few FTExtracts or Ejects are fairly normal during the first 200 rounds (though some never experience this) but should go away as the break in progresses.

Proper cleaning and lubrication of the PF-9 is absolutely essential for good function of the PF-9. The stuff that came in/on the pistol from the factory is preservative, not lubricant, and needs to be thoroughly cleaned out. Then lube the pistol well, using a quality grease as oil just does not provide any lasting lube for areas such as the rails, hammer interface, barrel lug cut out etc. For guidance on proper lubrication, check out the Goldenloki website. He provides good guidance on this.

So far as grip, stance, etc, the PF-9 is a very different animal from the ordinary service type (bigger, heavier) pistol. A good grip and technique are required to shoot these ultra light for caliber pistols, and so-called "limp wristing" can affect performance. I find a good many folks confuse grip with limp wristing. While a firm grip is needed, limp wristing has less to do with grip than letting the wrist flex during recoil. Wrist flex can absorb some of the recoil energy from the slide, affecting extraction and ejection. With a firm grip. lock the wrist, and "push" the hand forward. (tightens the wrist and helps keep it locked). Absorb the recoil in the elbow and upper arm.

A few range visits will soon dispel those "jitters" and familiarize you with your PF-9. It is a great weapon when you learn the proper techniques for shooting ultra lights and can even be fun to shoot, though it is by no means a " range gun" and is not intended for long extended shooting sessions. 50 rounds or so per session is probably more than enough, especially just starting out, to tire the hand and wrist. You do not want to shoot so much that you create a sub conscious flinch. It does bark a bit.

Hope you continue to enjoy your new pistol. Welcome to the KTOG as well. It is a great place for questions, advice, suggestions for improvements, and just all around information on KT products, as well as a place to share your experiences.

Jim R
 

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As others have stated, exposure is what will make the jitters go away. My wife and I went to the range a month or so ago and she was having trouble concentrating since the guy next door was shooting a 44 Magnum. :) :DShe didn't understand how I could just ignore it. Just practice and it'll get better.
 

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don't beat yourself up for "reeking of noobness" .
No one was born with with a gun in their hand.
and we all crawled before we could walk or run




One other issue Im having is a total nervousness while at the range. I dont ever remember being afraid of loud bangs and shooting. But it kind of over-ran me today at the range. Near the end of my session I was pretty shaky. Any tips on how to overcome this would be appreciated.

No offense, but a 9mm in such a small, light weight package may not be the best place to start.
if you can't afford a more suitable range gun to hone skills
(BTW, they don't have to be expensive..I hear Hi-Points shoot ball ammo just fine) ...they're just uhg-lee...:p.
But they're affordable

never the less, I'm wondering if your "nervousness and shaking" isn't contributing to the MALF (malfunctions)
limpwristing MALFs really aren't all that common...but a bad flinch IS to many new shooters.
That indeed will cause MALFs

You may or may not have a bad ext'r that needs attention .
loose ext'rs aren't a condition that goes away with "break-in" rnds down range .
I'd suggest your next range session you focus on your stance and hold .
(You "should" of been taught that in your CCW class ...if not, your instructor was a VERY poor one)

focus on fundamentals... especially your hold
...if you don't recall what you were (hopefully) taught, find an "experienced" shooter to show you a proper hold

Take two boxes of ammo (two different brands)
Don't be nervous .you "know" the pistol is going to bark and buck..
Just maintain a firm hold, focus on the front sight as you press the trigger.
Don't think about the "bang/whack" that's coming


see what happens then



..L.T.A.
 

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Heck....who can get used to the guy in the next lane shooting his Desert Eagle? Inside ranges are tough on the noise...try an outdoor range (assuming the range you're referring to is indoor)...I also like outdoor ranges for their openness...the indoor ranges seem cramped and confining.
 

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Welcome to KTOG and congrats on getting the new gun! It sounds like you're doing just fine considering it's been a while since you last shot a gun. Continue to practice and get used to the PF9, and stick around here and learn from everybody else. It's easier to learn from other people's mistakes then to make them yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wow thank you all! Lots of good advise, Ill keep you posted on my next trip to the range. Thanks again!
 

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I'm very interested to find out your results. I'm a new PF-9 owner myself and an experienced shooter but...My initial rough start with the 9 was not encouraging. The people here a great and gave me the confidence to persevere and tweak this and that and just shoot the thing and take it apart and clean and oil it and buff some spots up. Mine has worked out great and I like to shoot it plenty. I feel lucky to have rural land and can shoot any time. Good luck to you.
 

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I agree with all of this. I am lucky to have land to shoot on but when I didn't and it was real important I shot great, I would take a couple ibuprofen. Really worked for me. Also I shot my pf9 today for the first time as well and had an amazing experience. I shot the federal fmj 115gr.
 

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When I was younger, I participated extensively in the shooting sports and spent a lot of time in indoor and underground ranges. Between that and rock concerts I was concerned about my hearing so I got in the habit of wearing double ear protection (ear plugs and ear muffs) on the range. With that setup I don't hear anything I don't want to hear.
 
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