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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got my CMR last Friday. Due to weather I didn't get a chance to shoot it yet, still raining.

Here's what I found when I broke it down for an initial cleaning before firing, as recommended by the owners manual...

There were what seemed to be metal shavings inside the barrel bore!!! Grains of shiny steel cuttings that likely came when the rifling was cut. I ran a wire brush down it several times and got a sizable pile of shavings.

Then I cleaned it with a good gun clean/lube product with clothe patches. The rest of the gun, bolt, sliders, lower unit, were all in good condition, perhaps a bit greasy, so I gave them the same clean/lube and now it "feels" smoother.

Keltec must be running these guns out the door as fast as they can make them. Don't depend on a quality final cosmetic inspection before boxing. Read the manual and clean the gun thoroughly before use.
 

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Hoot, I'm moving this to the correct sub forum....You're posting about the CMR 30 in the PMR 30 sub forum.

Most people seem to ignore it, but we always tell new gun owners to clean and lube their new Kel Tec firearms...to remove the anti rust crap they use for shipping. It's just a good practice. KT doesn't clean them after test firing the firearms.

The particles you found in the barrel are probably left over filler crap and or powder from the test firing. There have been several posts about this lately....also, KT doesn't "cut" the rifling in the barrel. They use a "button" forced down the barrel at very high pressures. This sort of "molds" the rifling into the barrel. This process doesn't leave filings or the like like cutting would do, they just shove this button thing through the barrel and rifling is left...sort of like ironing.

Besides, Kel Tecs ISO9000 policies and practices require a thorough cleaning after the manufacturing of the barrel, to clean out anything solid and to clean the cooling/cutting fluids out...before assembly into a firearm.


Button rifling – faster and cheaper
Another way to rifle barrels is the most popular method used today. The button rifling method doesn’t cut the rifling pattern – it irons it into the barrel! A carbide tool called a button is either pushed (most common) or pulled through the barrel. As it moves, the hydraulic head also turns at the desired rifling twist rate. It is correct to say the button engraves a reverse of itself inside the bore, but it doesn’t do it by cutting. Instead, it displaces metal, actually hardening and smoothing the inside of the barrel as it goes.



A rifling button irons the bore into shape. This one is for microgroove rifling.
Rifling buttons wear just as broaches do, but because of how they are shaped and how they work, the wear is slower. Also, they leave a mirror surface behind them. Many of today’s custom barrelmakers use the button method, as do many high-volume barrelmakers.
http://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2006/10/how-are-barrels-rifled-part-2-button-rifling/
 

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hey hoot my experience mirrors yours mine was fairly dirty out of the box.i left my mags fully loaded for a few days and have yet to experience any issues with the mags.no miss feeds even during rapid fire.am also amased how accurate these cmrs really are using 40 gn and 45 gn ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Curt...it seems the CMR-30 needs heavy ammo in order to push that bolt back far enough to correctly feed the next round.

At the range today I experienced several load failures. These are brand new magazines, so I am loading them with 30 rounds to compress that spring to see if that "breaks in" the magazine.

When loading the magazines it seems after the first ten rounds or so, the following rounds tend to go in crooked and need to be pushed to one side or another. Loading those magazines is a process that requires a lot of attention.
 

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im sure once it breaks in it will feed the lighter rds as well.leaving my mags fully loaded seemed to help my grampa taught me this a long time ago.that mags need to be broken in just as much as anything else.good luck keep the info flowing we should be able to get these issues resolved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree, after shooting a few hundred rounds...the magazine is new and not reliable unless it is very very carefully loaded, each round seated fully back in the magazine. The gun seems to favor 40+ grain rounds...at least when new.

I believe the magazine spring has too much "push" and the rounds are so small and light they tend to jam up easily if not loaded properly.

The gun itself seems to function just fine. It's the magazine, in my opinion, causing all the failure to feed problems.
 

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regardless of gun/manufacturerer/source...

a new shooter to a new weapon should always break it down, clean it, lube it, learn it.

i always play the game that the previous owner was stupid, and i have to look out for their mistakes...

even if it's new, because KelTec for sure, pre tests their weapons, but they don't always clean them (obviously)
 

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Got my new CMR30 today about noon! When I got home,I looked it over carefully,inside and out. It was clean and well lubricated. Loaded the mags with 40gr CCI and started shooting, at my back yard range. The sights had to be adjusted, but it functioned flawlessly.I shot 50 rds of CCI 40 gr.Then I tried 50 rds of dynapoint. Had 1 FTE, but otherwise worked fine.Shot 10 rds of Hornady 45gr ftx also with no issues.The rifle is more accurate than I am. I load the mags with 25 rds as I do my PMR 30.Really happy with the weapon so far!
 
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