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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked up my brand new KS7 out of the box this week. Haven't had the chance to test it out yet but I greased and lubed it up and I've been cycling some cheapo dummy rounds from amazon through it and so far no failures to feed or eject. I am having some trouble getting shells into the feed tube. Sometimes they go in no problem but often they get caught on the edge of the tube and wont go in easily. Would this be because the gun is so new and needs to be broken in? Or does something need to be modified?

Like I'm watching this guy slide shells in with no effort but with mine its nowhere near that easy
 

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Just picked up a used/modified KS7 last weekend & shot it today. With a Primary Arms RDS on it, I think it will work pretty well for "home defense."

I suspect that developing the muscle memory to properly place the shells for entry into the magazine is going to take a fair amount of practice and many iterations to get it down, but I don't see any reason why it can't be done efficiently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It keeps doing this at random. Sometimes I can get 5 in there no problem then when I try again only 1 goes in and the next one gets stuck like this. I partly blame the CTG outer (part #331) being so stiff which over time should become smoother and broken in. But the edges of the feed tube could be beveled a little which I think would help a lot, I just don't want to go dremmeling a brand new gun unless its absolutely necessary.
Hand Everyday carry Gesture Wrist Strap
 

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It keeps doing this at random. Sometimes I can get 5 in there no problem then when I try again only 1 goes in and the next one gets stuck like this. I partly blame the CTG outer (part #331) being so stiff which over time should become smoother and broken in. But the edges of the feed tube could be beveled a little which I think would help a lot, I just don't want to go dremmeling a brand new gun unless its absolutely necessary. View attachment 56401
Do some hunting. There is a thread on breaking the edge of the tube to ease reloading.
 

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I contoured and smoothed the edge of the tube with a round ceramic knife sharpener. There was no danger of removing too much material (Dremel), the diameter of the sharpener approximately matched that of the tube so that my work was even, and the result was a smooth surface. I followed up with some liquid gun blue, and the result was functional and satisfactory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I contoured and smoothed the edge of the tube with a round ceramic knife sharpener. There was no danger of removing too much material (Dremel), the diameter of the sharpener approximately matched that of the tube so that my work was even, and the result was a smooth surface. I followed up with some liquid gun blue, and the result was functional and satisfactory.
So something like this sharpener? That sounds better and less risky. I work with power tools but not dremels so I don't trust myself with one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
EXACTLY like that sharpener. I use a Dremel all the time (best thing in the world to trim the dog's claws), but I wouldn't use one on a brand new firearm. And it turned out that I didn't need to!
Ok great. So would I do an in-and-out kind of motion or more like side to side?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I did both, but was careful to finish with an in-an-out motion because that would align any surface texture with the motion that shells will take.
Thanks this worked pretty well. I also used another smaller knife sharpener on the curved part of the lifter that the bolt carrier slides into and a little bit on the end of the bolt carrier itself. Pumps much smoother now. Will test it out next weekend as long as it doesn't rain. 👍
 

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Quick question: Is it ok to dry fire the KS7? I know for some guns its not good
Yes dryfire all you need. If rimfire you don't dryfire without a snapcap. Once or twice etc for rimfire won't hurt it. There are some arguments (anecdotal but of value also) against doing a lot of dryfiring with a center-fire but much depends on the gun (like Glock, there are stories).
 

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As above about the only guns that you need to be careful about dry firing are .22's.
That's because older .22's often would allow the firing pin to impact the area around the chamber and deform the metal.
This is very seldom the case with new designs made in the past 30 years of so, because almost everything today have positive firing pin stop systems in the action the prevent firing pin travel far enough to damage the barrel.
If a .22 is not dry fire-safe, the owner's manual will usually state that.

In the case of center fire firearms, virtually all of them are perfectly safe to dry fire as much as you want.
Many modern revolvers have pressed in firing pins that if dry fired "might " break the pin and require a factory repair to replace it.
If in doubt, use snap caps.

Guns like the KS7 have strong firing pins that can be very easily replaced, and are not prone to breakage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Alright finally got to get out and actually shoot it. Happy to say no cycle or feeding issues with the gun whatsoever. Kicks like a mother****er like everyone says. I got a cheapo buttpad off amazon and that definitely helped but I think I'll try getting a limbsaver and see if that's better. I was looking for the MCarbo Sherman tank muzzle break but I don't see it listed on their site anywhere so maybe its been discontinued. So guess I'll go with the Howitzer70 instead.

Edit: Actually I'm not seeing their KS7 vice block either so maybe I'll just use a couple peices of wood
 

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By all accounts, if you use an impact wrench on the Kel-Tec barrel nuts, you can often just hold the barrel down on a bench, with no barrel vise.
Of course you still need a quality barrel nut tool. like the M-carbo.

Apparently M-Carbo no long make the tank type muzzle brake, but you could contact them, and ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
By all accounts, if you use an impact wrench on the Kel-Tec barrel nuts, you can often just hold the barrel down on a bench, with no barrel vise.
Of course you still need a quality barrel nut tool. like the M-carbo.

Apparently M-Carbo no long make the tank type muzzle brake, but you could contact them, and ask.
Yeah I got my impact at work so I'll just grab that and a barrel nut socket from M-Carbo. I emailed them and said if they happened to have one of the Sherman Tank muzzle brakes laying around I'll gladly give them money for it lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
After looking more into it, I'm thinking either the Howitzer70 or the Defender muzzle breaks. But it looks like the Howitzer only makes a 70% difference when using slugs? Not planning on using slugs for the most part so would the slightly cheaper Defender be the better choice? Has anyone tried both?
 

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In shotguns, muzzle brakes are not nearly as effective as on rifles, due to the much lower pressures of shotguns.
Muzzle brakes work by a jet effect of high pressure gas venting, much like a rocket.
In shotguns the lower pressures just can't develop the jet effect enough to give a lot of reduction of recoil.

General consensus is that muzzle brakes on shotguns don't deliver anything like the advertised recoil reductions.
It appears the most effect with a muzzle brake on a Kel-Tec is mostly a cosmetic addition for appearance.

Do some reading on the KS7 and KSG areas for some past discussion on muzzle brakes and how to reduce felt recoil.
Bottom line is, you get far more actual felt recoil reduction by installing an enhanced recoil pad, and more then anything, by using reduced recoil shells.

Reduced Recoil shotgun shells are in use by law enforcement due to small or women cops having problems with the pounding abuse of standard buckshot.
The Reduced Recoil buckshot and slug loads are just as effective at normal shotgun defense ranges.
 

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I have the thicker Kel-Tec butt pad, a Limbsaver slip-on butt pad, and the Defender muzzle brake on my KS7, and recoil firing full power slug rounds (1600 fps, 1 ounce) is absolutely punishing. I honestly think that there is nothing that you can do for the KS7 that will make firing more than two full power slug rounds tolerable. If you're going to fire slugs, buy the reduced power rounds. I've qualified with them for the sheriff's office with my Benelli, and the difference is stunning. My sheriff's office issued only reduced power slug rounds.

That said, the setup I have on my KS7 makes firing full power buckshot quite tolerable. You can shoot them all day. I don't think that the muzzle brake does much, as @dfariswheel explained. But the double butt pads make quite a difference, and the longer length of pull makes the KS7 fit me better.
 
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