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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m about to take delivery of a KSG 15 shot. The YouTube videos I’ve watched talk about the shotgun having a healthy recoil, and I’m wondering if any of you have muzzle breaks and what is your opinion of them. Thanks for your input.
 

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This has been explored before on KTOG as it pertains to both the KSG and KS7, but the shorthand is that since the function of a muzzle break depends on pressure and shotguns do not develop the high pressures of rifles or handguns, they have only minor effects in reducing perceived recoil on shotguns. Some benefit, but not terribly significant. The greatest benefit of a muzzle break on a bullpup shotgun is that it makes it less likely that you will inadvertently get your support hand out in front of the muzzle. The most effective means of reducing felt recoil on a shotgun are butt pads, reduced recoil shells, and avoiding magnum and slug rounds.
 

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General consensus is that a shotgun muzzle break isn't nearly as effective as a rifle or pistol brake because of the lower pressure shotguns generate.
Some people notice not much effect, others may notice more.
The actual weight of a brake has an effect.

Bottom line, if you're expecting a lot of reduction you may be disappointed, but you may feel at least some difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This has been explored before on KTOG as it pertains to both the KSG and KS7, but the shorthand is that since the function of a muzzle break depends on pressure and shotguns do not develop the high pressures of rifles or handguns, they have only minor effects in reducing perceived recoil on shotguns. Some benefit, but not terribly significant. The greatest benefit of a muzzle break on a bullpup shotgun is that it makes it less likely that you will inadvertently get your support hand out in front of the muzzle. The most effective means of reducing felt recoil on a shotgun are butt pads, reduced recoil shells, and avoiding magnum and slug rounds.
Thank you for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
General consensus is that a shotgun muzzle break isn't nearly as effective as a rifle or pistol brake because of the lower pressure shotguns generate.
Some people notice not much effect, others may notice more.
The actual weight of a brake has an effect.

Bottom line, if you're expecting a lot of reduction you may be disappointed, but you may feel at least some difference.
Thank you.
 

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TheFirearmBlog covered a new shotgun suppressor at SHOT that looks really promising… if I were to go for a muzzle device on my KS7 I’d go that way.

 

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Unfortunately a suppressor starts out with $200 and about a year's wait for the license.
Then too, you're open to unwanted interest from the BATF that can continue years later if they decide to change things.
Yeah, the tax sucks.

My first suppressor was as approved in three months last year though the new electronic system, so the wait has significantly improved.

If the feds want to be interested in you they already have all the info they need. Registering a can doesn’t change that. I used to share your opinion, but not anymore.
 

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No, the accuracy squad. Incorrect usage destroys credibility; it speaks volumes of the author. And another negative: I'm not an English major or other such creature, rather an engineer with degrees in mathematics & chemistry. Tolerance of imprecision is, at best, ignorance; at worst, sloth.
 

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Some benefit, but not terribly significant. The greatest benefit of a muzzle break on a bullpup shotgun is that it makes it less likely that you will inadvertently get your support hand out in front of the muzzle. The most effective means of reducing felt recoil on a shotgun are butt pads, reduced recoil shells, and avoiding magnum and slug rounds.
The other very important benefit is, the ability to add a screw-in choke tube. This greatly improves the versatility of the KSG (which only comes with an 'improved cylinder').
I have THIS ONE on mine:

I knew the short barrel would need a lot of help so I screwed an "extra-full" choke-tube in it.
Overkill!!!:eek:
It reduced the pattern size to 1/4 of original.
 

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The other very important benefit is, the ability to add a screw-in choke tube. This greatly improves the versatility of the KSG (which only comes with an 'improved cylinder').
I have THIS ONE :

I knew the short barrel would need a lot of help so I screwed an "extra-full" choke-tube in it.
Overkill!!!:eek:
It reduced the pattern size to 1/4 of original.
Just be certain to never fire a slug round.
 

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One more thing: For self-defense, a cylinder bore can be the best option. The Federal LE132 00-buck load uses its proprietary Flitecontrol wad that performs best with no choke restriction. From the cylinder-bore barrel on my 870 it shoots a 9" group @ 25 yards. Amazing load. (I own other Kel-Tecs, no KSG - yet.)
In general, advances in wad design have stretched the effective range of shot loads tremendously while also making patterns more uniform. I find testing loads on silhouette targets at various ranges up to 50 yards to be very educational.
 

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The improved cylinder advice is generally true, but there are some exceptions.

However, what is meant by "short-range"?

Also, by implication, with tighter chokes will we be seeing KSGs in the duck blind?
With a full-choke, I don't see why not, other than you would have to put plugs in both mag tubes to meet the round restrictions.
Even with a modified tube, it is awesome!
Just ask @lop why I was discreetly told to never bring it back to their "Sporting Clays" course because I was 'cheating'.o_O
A lot of their wealthy members with $2400+ Benelli's were crying bigtime.😪
As far as 'short-range' goes, ask yourself why every shotgun you ever saw from 10 years on back, had a barrel 24" or longer.
It was needed for 'normal range'.(y)
And yes, for self-defense, an improved-cylinder is best.
 

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Re: the duck blind, my waterfowl hunting has been most successful with a shotgun that swings through smoothly to get the right lead with a proper cheek weld, the vent rib helping sighting. Using a KSG for this is highly counterintuitive. Getting on target must certainly be quicker, but it would seem that the swing would take some getting used to given the KSG's much lower polar moment of inertia compared to conventional shotguns.
Not sure what you mean by 24" or longer comment. It seemed the manufacturers were simply catering to the market - shooters are conservative and are slow to adopt new designs.
Over 40 years ago I had a gunsmith shorten an 870 vent rib barrel (2 3/4" chamber) and install a Poly-Choke device (pre-screw-in choke days) for a total length of 18.25" Absolutely GREAT for Ohio's thick brush and woods and excellent in the duck blind, too. After showing it to some customers, he did a number of them. Ugly, but effective.
BTW, never caught the clays, skeet, or trap bug - couldn't find a good recipe for clay pigeon.
 

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Re: choking, the Federal LE132 00-buck load patterns best from a cylinder bore - period. It's a proven load. Federal recommends only a cylinder bore. We tried a few rounds from an improved cylinder barrel and the patterns looked like those of a Skeet "spreader" load.
Bottom line: Test some loads in your shotgun at various distances to see which best meets your needs, then practice.
 
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