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Anyone have issues with Mag Spring Fatigue, keeping their mags fully loaded?

I have not had problems with this in my other guns actually I have had more issues with springs wearing out with repeated use over just keeping them loaded.
But I thought I'd ask.

Thanks,
Del
 

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I agree and think that yours is the general concensus though this is a matter of some debate. Some insist on down-loading mags, rotating them, etc. I've never had a magspring fatigue problem.
 

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It is probably more of an issue with the Magazine Catch than it is the spring. If you push the mag into the pistol w/o holding down the mag release button, the catch gets worn away quickly. IMHO the catch should have been made out of metal, not plastic.
I was having a simular problem when I had the finger extensions on my magazines. The mags popped out with almost every shot. I just got my upgraded metal catch from Beach and the magazine won't pop out by hand (need to go to the range today or tomorrow and verify this is true with shooting - which I am pretty sure it will be).

Burleigh
 
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have my MAK magazines loaded all the time. Been that way for 10 years, Works every time, never a failure-EVER. Just don't think that is a problem with any of the kt's either. Wolff's does make available for the 32 and 380 (same spring) a 10% extra strength magazine spring, of which I have in all of my kt mini's-just because I wanted them in there, not because of any failure of the factory springs ::)
 

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I wouldn't worry about them taking a set from staying loaded.
It's actually the compression cycles of loading / unloading or shooting that weakens a mag spring, not leaving it compressed. (Exception being some of the the newer hi-cap double column like Glocks and others. They should have taken a lesson from John B. on his Hi-Power mag. They can't be over-compressed, and can be left fully loaded till dooms-day, but then they don't hold 17 rounds like a Glock, only 13!)

Glock didn't leave enough room for the fully compressed spring when they designed them, and they do weaken from being over-compressed beyond the springs yield point. I have some Glock 23 mags that have been fully loaded 10 - 11 years, and they are about ready for new springs.
 
On the other hand, I have two pre-war Colt woodsman that had fully loaded mags in them, full of old copper cased UMC .22's when I bought them from estates. I assume they had been fully loaded sometime in 1936-37 or so, and left that way for 70+ years without weakening the springs.

Also have bought GI .45 mags in WWII canvas mag pouches with WWII dated ammo in them that are still 100%.

Some of my .45 mags and my S&W Model 39 mags have been fully loaded for going on 40 years now without a spring problem.

Same with a bunch of Vietnam era M16/AR15 20 & 30 round mags I keep loaded.

Same with some Ruger Mini-14 20's & 30's that have been stored loaded 20+ years now.

These guns were all designed from the get-go to not over-compress the springs with a full mag. They just don't ever weaken even from being left loaded for a lifetime, it seems!

As for P3AT mags, I can't say for sure.
Mine have only been loaded two years now, and nothings happening yet!


rcmodel
 

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If a magazine has been fully loaded for years and years how do you know the springs are still 100%?

Seems the only way to know would be to shoot them.

I have always taken one round out / full capacity -1 when I store them - not really sure why I developed this habit - I have talked with a few LEO's that claim they replace the mag springs in their carry gun every year. But that would be a combo of use and just being loaded all the time.

I know some guns - even after they are fully broken in - will experience jamming problems when a new magazine is used. The solution is always the same - fill the mag to capacity and let it sit for a while. From what I have read this always solves the problem. So I would think that keeping it fully loaded MUST have an impact - because it DOES.

I know the spring in my step is not as great as it was when I was young. Maybe I should try and stay "fully loaded" ;)

If a problem ever did develop - I would think it would be the last round or two in the mag that would not feed.
 

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z71bill said:
If a magazine has been fully loaded for years and years how do you know the springs are still 100%?

Seems the only way to know would be to shoot them.
I do shoot them, and they still work.

The initial spring "set" on a new mag spring is a one-time deal. All springs take a "set" the first few times they are compressed.

After that, if the mag is properly designed so as not to over-compress the spring, and it was a good spring to start with, only repeated compression cycles from high use are what wears them out, not staying compressed.
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/GunTech/NewsletterArchive.aspx?p=0&t=1&i=603


rcmodel
 

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The only magazine spring I have ever had go bad was in my 64 year old Walther PPK.

I have trouble shot it and narrowed the problem down to:

1. Maybe I left the spring compressed (fully loaded) too long.

Or:

2. Maybe I cycled the spring too many times. (Shooting it)

Packer.
 
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Two Pistol Packer said:
  I assume that someone named Heinrich or Fritz or some other German name was the original Nazi owner, so warranty probably doesn't apply?

Packer.
might have been a "frenchman" AND THERE FOR NEVER FIRED. ;D
 
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