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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Firearms should not be that cheap, sorry. BOO!(n):cautious:
 

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Firearms should not be that cheap, sorry. BOO!(n):cautious:
Hi points are big crude heavy and butt ugly. The also tend to go bang and send the bullet down range with acceptable accuracy for the intend purpose. They offer a option for someone without the money to buy a better gun. No I don’t own one but if money was tight and I needed something to protect my family at home it certainly beats a tennis racket while waiting for the calvary.
 

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Hi points are big crude heavy and butt ugly. The also tend to go bang and send the bullet down range with acceptable accuracy for the intend purpose. They offer a option for someone without the money to buy a better gun. No I don’t own one but if money was tight and I needed something to protect my family at home it certainly beats a tennis racket while waiting for the calvary.
Fits the Buy American mantra too.

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55615


I got this a few weeks ago. Zastava M70 Yugoslavian police/military surplus in .32 acp. It's in really great shape for a surplus gun, according to the stamp on the bottom of grip it was made in 1982. I like it. It was $225 for the gun, 2 magazines, and a funky communist police holster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
View attachment 55615

I got this a few weeks ago. Zastava M70 Yugoslavian police/military surplus in .32 acp. It's in really great shape for a surplus gun, according to the stamp on the bottom of grip it was made in 1982. I like it. It was $225 for the gun, 2 magazines, and a funky communist police holster.
Can you get a 3 fingers grip?
 

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Good gun [Ruger P85], but no, intentionally leaving out 9mm. Too common.
No mouse guns either.
.30, .32, .380/super. etc.
Its a short list, but should be interesting.
You can include the Ruger P89, if not the P85. Ruger produced a limited number of "convertible" P89X variants with factory barrels chambered in .30 Luger, included in the box with the standard 9mm barrel. Unfortunately, they've become collectible, and rather pricey (although not as pricey as some other, super-rare P-series Rugers).

You used to be able to find the 30 caliber barrels (with factory .30 Luger captured recoil spring/guide rod assembly) on auction sites from time to time, but they rarely turn up now; the last one I saw was last year on GunBroker, and it went for about $200. Just as an FYI, the .30 Luger barrels do NOT fit early P89s (under serial number 304-70000, ask me how I know). On the other hand, they should also fit the early 9mm P94s with barrel links, assuming you don't mind the muzzle sticking out of the slide a bit (you'll have to use the P94 guide rod). Finally, a .30 Luger barrel will definitely work on a Ruger P91, if you swap out the 40 caliber slide for a P89 9mm slide (which may require minor fitting to accommodate the P91 ejector ;>)...
 

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I'd forgotten the P89 convertible. Back when I was obsessively collecting the P85, 90 & 91 I was looking for a P89 convertible to round out the collection. I got distracted by SUB9s & went off down that rabbit hole.

I did remember the P11 export .380s but that is NOT a large frame semi auto.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
You can include the Ruger P89, if not the P85. Ruger produced a limited number of "convertible" P89X variants with factory barrels chambered in .30 Luger, included in the box with the standard 9mm barrel. Unfortunately, they've become collectible, and rather pricey (although not as pricey as some other, super-rare P-series Rugers).

You used to be able to find the 30 caliber barrels (with factory .30 Luger captured recoil spring/guide rod assembly) on auction sites from time to time, but they rarely turn up now; the last one I saw was last year on GunBroker, and it went for about $200. Just as an FYI, the .30 Luger barrels do NOT fit early P89s (under serial number 304-70000, ask me how I know). On the other hand, they should also fit the early 9mm P94s with barrel links, assuming you don't mind the muzzle sticking out of the slide a bit (you'll have to use the P94 guide rod). Finally, a .30 Luger barrel will definitely work on a Ruger P91, if you swap out the 40 caliber slide for a P89 9mm slide (which may require minor fitting to accommodate the P91 ejector ;>)...
9 years and 152 posts. A man of few words. I am honored.
 

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9 years and 152 posts. A man of few words. I am honored.
Don't feel too honored - all gun owners have opinions (some of which may actually be based on fact & experience ;^), and we all like to talk about what we think is important! So, just remember that my posts are worth exactly what you paid for them.

Multi-caliber firearms are an area of interest for me, which is why I bought my first Kel-Tec: a P11, to which I added a 40 cal conversion kit and .357SIG barrel (and eventually a TI .22 conversion kit, plus a 'WECSOG'ed .380 top half/magazine ;^). A lot of people seem to like the ability to change calibers in rifles (which is one reason ARs are popular), but it seems to be less appreciated among handgun owners. IMHO, a multi-caliber firearm is worth it's weight in gold (or ammo) during an ammunition shortage!
 
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Colt 1903 Pocket Hammerless .32 ACP 4" barrel
Found this bucket gun a couple of years ago. Hardly ever leaves the safe but a great shooter.
Perfect!
Has everything you need, nothing you don't. I was waiting to see if someone would put up one.
 

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My stepfather has one of thes but chrome. It's a nice gun. The FI, Star, and Iver Johnson are all pretty much the same. I read somewhere they were all trying to get a deal to license it with Colt.
Colt was definitely involved, to the point that a small number of single-action Colt Pony .380s were actually produced. You can find photos on the net (or see next post, below): they are identical to the early FI Model D, except the slide has Colt roll markings, the grips have Colt medallions, the mags have a small "C" marking, and they came in Colt boxes. The handful that were produced were reportedly sold to Colt employees.

Unfortunately, Colt backed out at the last minute (perhaps an early manifestation of the 'flakey' Colt management style of recent years ;^), leaving FI holding the bag - which included a bunch of completed frames with Colt Pony serial numbers ("CPA" prefix). In an attempt to salvage the situation, FI had slides produced (by Star, back in Spain??) with FI-markings, added them (with other parts) to the unused Colt frames, and sold them as their Model D. At some point Iver Johnson got involved (seems like I've seen a few IJ-marked guns with CPA serial numbers, which I suppose could be IJ top halves on FI/Colt frames). Finally, somewhere along the line - maybe when the Colt parts were used up - the design was changed; IIRC, the most noticeable difference was a simplified lockup between slide & barrel. Most of the IJ Pony's that I've seen (plus some of the FI Model D's) have the later-style, simplified barrel/slide assemblies.

I owned an early FI with CPA serial number for a few years, but sold it to a local FFL a while back - never fired it, but it looked & felt like a very well made handgun. Colt Government .380 mags fit fine, but were a bit long; apparently when Colt finally got around to marketing their own .380, they must have based the mags on the original single-action Colt Pony/Star .380 mags.

Speaking of Star auto pistols - I have not seen anyone mention the Star Model A, which was originally designed a century ago for the 9mm Bergmann-Bayard (9mm Largo), but many of which were modified to handle .38ACP (or .38 Super, depending on the info source you read
). The modified Model A's had slides that were marked both "9mm" and "38" (slides marked "9mm P" are Model B 9mm Parabellum slides). Apparently there were also 60-100 Model AS's imported in the 1970s, that were specifically manufactured/chambered for the .38 Super, with the slide marked "38" (with NO "9mm" markings), and factory boxes that were labeled "38 Super". There are photos on the net (or see next post, below); but like the genuine Colt Pony SA .380s, the guns are pretty tough to find.

FWIW, most of the 1911's that we see in the movies are apparently Star A's or B's; they're a bit slimmer, lighter & easier for actors/actresses to hold, and reportedly function more reliably with blank ammo than do real 1911s, so the companies that provide "movie guns" keep lots of Stars in stock.

Go to Star-Firearms.com for info, although parts of the above are from memory/other sources...
 

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Figured I would add some internet photos of the original single-action Colt Pony .380 (manufactured primarily by Star), and also the Star Model AS in .38 Super (NOT 9mm Largo or 9mm Parabellum). First, the Colt .380:

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Followed by the Star .38 Super:

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If you like unusual firearms, and come across either one of these, it might be worth picking up for the right price!
 
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