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A Winchester Model 70 Alaskan in .338 Win Mag with Bear Loads. I used a PAST recoil pad to sight it in. Sore shoulder and the recoil onto the cheek piece of the stock slapped the heck out of my face. Ended up giving the rifle away to my youngest son who is 3 inches taller and about 30 pounds of muscle heavier than me. I will stick to my Win Mod 70 featherweight 30-06.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Back in 1972 my Pop Pop brought a really beautiful Parker SxS 12 gauge up to our house. We went outside, he put 2 rounds in it, and handed it to me. I was 8 years old. I messed up and pulled both triggers....and ended up on my ***. I did not shoot that gun again until I was 16. In the mid 80's I bought a Marlin .444 from a co worker. It did not have a recoil pad on it. That thing kicked like a stud mule. I traded it and $200 for a Mini 14 in 1989. I still have the Parker but was happy to get rid of the .444.
I bought a Marlin 444 in the early 80's. It had a recoil pad installed that helped a lot. It was a real thumper but would not shoot any cast bullet I tried worth a damn. It would shoot jacketed bullets ok, but the sheer volume I shot of every caliber was so large that I had to be able to shoot cast handloads to bring the ammo cost down. I finally gave up and sold it. It had Micro Groove rifling. Brian Pierce of Handloader and Rifle states he has had good luck with Micro Groove barrels in the .444 but I guess he knows something I don't. I believe Marlin changed the rifling to Ballard style about 20 years ago. Apparently, I was not alone in my troubles with cast and Micro Groove. Yeah, it was a kicker.
 

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45-70 Marlin lever action. Shot it on a Sunday still felt it on Wednesday. Will do it again and again. Was so much fun. But won’t replace my SU16A
 

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My neighbor restores old rifles. He let me shoot his Holland and Holland double barrel rifle when I was a kid. I think my shoulder landed about ten feet behind me.
 

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I just looked up the DoubleTap in .45 acp because it looks like a very painful pistol to fire in .45 acp or even 9mm. Holy cow! Are they seriously wanting $500 for those things?!?!?!?! I wonder what the street price of those things are? I believe I can find far better SD firearms for far less money than $500.
I'll tell ya, on his example, the pistol is pretty nice. Solid feel, tight lockup, no slop at all. It's a very well built firearm as far as fit and finish. But when I squeezed two off, it was instantly OFF my bucket list. $500 definitely seems steep, though I'm not sure if the current state of things hasn't inflated the price a bit. I never thought to check the going rate on them after I shot it. I wanted that experience scrubbed from memory.
 

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I have this firearm, but have not done this yet. The Midland Backpacker 12 Gauge comes with a 3" chamber and weighs 4 and a half pounds. There are a few X-framed revolvers that weighmore than that. This is based of a Beretta model 412 design and folds pretty much completely in half so it packs small. It has an interchangeable Beretta style screw in choke:
Midland_12G.png


Brenneke puts out a slug called the Magnum Crush that fires an ounce and a half slug (thats about 650 grains) at 1600 feet per second. That is around 3700 ft lbs of energy, but that particular slug is supposedly for rifled barrels only (or at least no choke)

Magnum Crush.jpg


Brenneke also puts out a 1 3/8 ounce slug called the Black Magic Magnum that is a 1 3/8 ounce (602 grain) slug going about 1500 fps for a little over 3000 foot pounds of energy:

BMM.jpg

If the 45/70 was brutal, those Magnum Crush energy numbers above are more aligned with a .338 Winchester Magnum. The Black Magic Magnum is about the energy of a 45/70 with a bullet that weights 150% of the heavy 405 grain load. I think other than not having the lever to rip your fingers off (but that action opening lever ahead of the trigger guard looks pretty sketchy) This 12 gauge that weighs like a light 22 rifle would hit a cheek and a shoulder pretty good. I think a KS7 that weight about 2 pounds more is pretty aggressive with full power federal 1 1/4 ounce 3" slugs moving around the same speeds. I have fired that in a t-shirt and it is definitely an attention getter. The only way I think the single shot above could be uglier is with about an extra inch of drop at the comb, and a second barrel that you could somehow touch off at the same time.
 

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Yeah, I've been slow to respond here. I'm pretty sure I shot l4e's 45-70. That might mean I meet Rat76 but didn't realize it. I was at shoots in '09 and '10 if I'm not mistaken.

I do remember at one of those shoots someone bought their wife a revlover rifle in .44 mag. It had this wicked sharp curved BRASS but plate. Very painful. Was the kick that hard? Not sure, but the pain was great.

Shot someone's barrett (L4E?). With the break it was not bad on the shoulder. My teeth tingled. It was awesome. Pizza is not awesome. Volcanoes are awesome. Forest fires are awesome. Baretts are awesome. But the kick wasn't to bad. Go figure.

I've a pic of me shooting a comped .500 s/w up at fido's (what ever happened to Fido?). Not to bad. The comp worked pretty well.

Like Dark said, the size of the punch is just one part of the equation. The weight, shape, and design of the interface between the 'sploshion and your nerve endings means a lot.

Guns I have that kick a bit are:
.357 in an lcr. Horse power to weight ratio
.44 mag in a 2 inch snubbie. Again, that ration. And both with dinky handles. The lcr at least has some rubber. The s/w has a narrow boot grip with cushioning steal and walnut.
.44 mag '94 winchester before I put a limb saver on it. After? Easy enough.
.270 winchester out of a walnut gripped pistol (t/c Encore 14 inch). Easier with the rubber grips, but oh so pretty in walnut.
.454 Casull in same, but a 10 inch pipe without the scope. 'Light weight' can't really be used, but lighter than the .270 and more bite.
.454 in a single action Freedom arms and a Taurus lever action. Quit the thump, but pretty manageable due to good design.
.380 out of a p3at. Still not an easy gun to shoot.

lop
 

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I was at the '08 Knob Creek & the '09 McPherson shoots. First & second KTOG Nationals.

Me with L4E's Barrett;

DSCF8834.JPG
 

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When I was stationed at Patrick AFB in Florida, I was at the Gun range shooting my S&W model 15 in .38. A major put his .44 magnum in front of me with some hot loads and told me to try it. After shooting 10 rounds, (I did hit the target) I couldn’t hold my .38 steady enough to get on the target. I had to pack up and leave. I weighed about 130 soaking wet, so there wasn’t an ounce of muscle on me. Afterward, I wish I had disobeyed the major.
 

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Worst handgun was lop's .44mag snubby. That bugger kicks more than his .454 (much longer barrel), and phideaux's .460 and grayhound's .500. I think the .460 and .500 were so heavy that they muted the recoil a bit. No "recoil muting" with that dang little .44mag though. Snappy little hand killer.

Worst rifle is a tie between phideaux's H&R .45-70 (metal buttplate) and ape's Mosin M38 - fired prone, also with a metal buttplate.
 

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Back in 1972 my Pop Pop brought a really beautiful Parker SxS 12 gauge up to our house. We went outside, he put 2 rounds in it, and handed it to me. I was 8 years old. I messed up and pulled both triggers....and ended up on my ***. I did not shoot that gun again until I was 16. In the mid 80's I bought a Marlin .444 from a co worker. It did not have a recoil pad on it. That thing kicked like a stud mule. I traded it and $200 for a Mini 14 in 1989. I still have the Parker but was happy to get rid of the .444.
35 Remington when I was 9 yo had been shooting my 22 all afternoon. Knocked me backwards and in the glider. I didn’t drop the rifle just sat on the glider. My uncle was laughing so hard he had tears running down both cheeks. It took quite a while to live that down.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
45-70 Marlin lever action. Shot it on a Sunday still felt it on Wednesday. Will do it again and again. Was so much fun. But won’t replace my SU16A
Mike Venturino of Handloader and Rifle magazine has written several times about the time he 1st fired a .45-70. He had bought a Marlin 1895 in .45-70 and the 1st thing he did was to installed a scope on it and handload some ammo for it following Elmer Keith's recipe for his favorite .45-70 load. Well, when Mike pulled the trigger on that 1st shot, he immediately saw stars, moon, comets, and old Popeye cartoons flashing in front of his face. The recoil drove the scope into his head above the eye giving Mike the worse scope cut he ever had. He was cut all the way to the bone over his shooting eye. While he was trying to staunch the pouring blood, he noticed that the recoil had split the skin on his shoulder so he was bleeding freely from the shoulder as well. That was the only round he ever fired from that rifle. He sold it shortly afterward. Later he got into BCPR competition and loaded and fired thousands of rounds of BCPR ammo from his Sharps and Remington Rolling blocks in many really big buffalo rifle calibers, including .45-70, but never never again loaded them to Elmer's level. He forever afterward loaded them only to black powder level. Ouch!
:D
 

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Agreed, the P40 recoils rather smartly. But for even more fun, fire a few 158 gr. .357 Magnum loads in a S&W 340PD with those tiny boot grips - and do it one-handed, bullseye-style. The little beast weighs less than 12 oz. , so hang on TIGHT.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
Agreed, the P40 recoils rather smartly. But for even more fun, fire a few 158 gr. .357 Magnum loads in a S&W 340PD with those tiny boot grips - and do it one-handed, bullseye-style. The little beast weighs less than 12 oz. , so hang on TIGHT.
No thank you. I wish all the people who buy small frame short barelled .357 snubbies for SD could test fire those bad boys before they plunk down their cash. The blast, flash, and recoil is going to be so severe, they will NOT practice with them the way you should for a SD gun. If they want an revolver for EDC, a .38 with good loads ( I'm thinking Federal HST or Buffalo Bore .38 for Short Barrels here ) or .44 Special ( I carried 200 gr Silvertip HP in mine ) would be a far, far better choice. At least you could practice with them enuff to get proficient and have a good time doing so. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I disagree. I love those who buy such featherweight gats before firing some hot SD ammo. They often trade them in very quickly on a less painful choice. So I have found some terrific bargains on the used shelf at the LGS, especially when they give a discount for cash. Just ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
I disagree. I love those who buy such featherweight gats before firing some hot SD ammo. They often trade them in very quickly on a less painful choice. So I have found some terrific bargains on the used shelf at the LGS, especially when they give a discount for cash. Just ask.
Hadn't thought of it like that! I think you have something there! ;)
 
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