GoldenLoki Services

Discussion in 'P-3AT' started by Guambodian, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. Guambodian

    Guambodian New Member

    68
    Dec 1, 2009
    I'm looking for info from people who have had work done by Goldenloki. I have a brand new P3at that I want to send in, so I'm trying to figure out what other services are available (that aren't listed on his site). I want to get my ducks in a row before I send a price check email. Thanks in advance for all help.
     
  2. nmshooter

    nmshooter New Member

    Jan 25, 2008

  3. wheelguy

    wheelguy New Member

    May 4, 2007
    Might ask if he'll do a "melt" job too - if this is for CCW.
     
  4. Guambodian

    Guambodian New Member

    68
    Dec 1, 2009
    Thanks for the replies. Sorry for the noobness but what is a melt job and how is it beneficial? Also, should I send my new pistol in before or after my "break in period"? I see reference on his site to a "rampectomy". I'm assuming this is a mod of some sort to the feed ramp. I'm guessing it would be a polishing of some sort or a grind akin to angled valve grinds on motor heads. Any info (including pricing) on this would be greatly appreciated.
     
  5. bama

    bama Active Member

    51
    Nov 25, 2004
    I would never have any work done until you break the pistol in. If you have any warranty issues and have to send it back your claim will be taken care of right away if work has been done from a third party you may run into some resistance from the factory. Also if any issues come up during break-in you can talk to Goldenloki about them and maybe there is no need to send it back to the factory. His knowledge of Kel-Tec products is quite extensive and accurate if it has to do with Kel-Tec he has probably already seen it or knows about it.
     
  6. wheelguy

    wheelguy New Member

    May 4, 2007
    +1 to breaking it in first. Not just the firearm - but your knowledge of it. You should know it well inside and out before sending it out for modification - so that you know what you are looking at when you get it back.

    Melt - smoothing of all corners and edges to make it easier to draw from carry under stress.

    Rampectomy - not unless it is required to keep hollow points from being mashed in. Shoot 1 round, then remove the one that gets chambered and look at the end of the hollow point. Try several, and see if your carry ammo is getting hit (by the ramp). If so, the first order of business is to ensure you have no lube on your feed lips, ammo cases, or on the slide bar that presses against the topmost round. Keeping those spots dry increases friction, which should keep the top round from slipping forward - allowing it to be hit by the feed ramp.
     
  7. RAT76

    RAT76 Well-Known Member


    :eek:

    OOPS!!!

    That slide/hammer interface bar is one of the places that SHOULD have a light coat of grease. Along with the slide rails & assembly pin.



    Check GL's lube recomendations.
     
  8. Guambodian

    Guambodian New Member

    68
    Dec 1, 2009
    Ok thanks guys. I plan to field strip my gun, sand any burs or what not then clean and lube it well. That will be followed by a trip to the range with a planned 100rnds through the gun. Locally though, I can only find PMC so I guess it will have to do.
     
  9. wheelguy

    wheelguy New Member

    May 4, 2007
    :eek:

    OOPS!!!

    That slide/hammer interface bar is one of the places that SHOULD have a light coat of grease.  Along with the slide rails & assembly pin.

    Check GL's lube recomendations.[/quote]
    I can't say it'll work for everyone, but that was one of the things I did to get rid of dented Hollow Points. For the hot loads I like to use, a rampectomy alone didn't work - so I started NOT lubing parts that might cause the top round to slip during recoil, and the bottom surface of that bar holding down the topmost round is the prime suspect.

    What I believe is happening is this. Prior to firing, the top round may have slid forward a bit due to the forward force of stripping off the round on top of it. Then, during recoil of the one in the chamber, friction between the bottom of the bar and the top round pulls the top round back where it should be - preventing the ramp from hitting it.

    If someone can explain or show a slow motion vid of what's really happening - I'm always open to advice.