Free Combat Revolver manual

Discussion in 'The Counter' started by lklawson, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    Those of you who know me on Facebork may have seen this timeline post just go up.

    I have completed the republishing the rare WWI combat revolver manual "The Service Revolver and How to Use It" by Captain Charles D. Tracy.

    Tracy explodes some myths about skills and knowledge that we now have concerning early combat handgunning. His text includes instruction on aimed fire, "snap shooting," shooting in the dark, dry fire practice, active drills, reactive targets, safety, cover vs. concealment, semi-auto vs. revolver, eye dominance and two-eye shooting, and even the classic "caliber wars!"

    Every time I see these sort of things, I think, "dude was way ahead of this time," but the truth may be more accurately that our forebearers were not even "cutting edge" for the time, we just forgot how much they knew and busy ourselves by congratulating our own awesomeness.

    The PDF is, of course, available for free from my Lulu site. A print edition available as well, though I can't make Lulu send you one of those for free, it's still pretty cheap. And will try to get a ePub version ready for those of you who prefer eReaders.

    Special thanks to Lawrence Skuse for making the text available to me for this project.

    Here is the free download:
    http://www.lulu.com/shop/charles-d-...and-how-to-use-it/ebook/product-23483904.html

    Paperback tree-ware for your bookshelf:
    http://www.lulu.com/shop/charles-d-...how-to-use-it/paperback/product-23483947.html

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
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  2. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    If you downloaded this book and like it, I'd sure appreciate a 5 star review. This helps others interested in the topic to find, and decide to download, this book. If you bought the tree-ware, I'd ask the same. Please give it a review. For that matter, if you downloaded any other of the free content from my Lulu site, please give it a 5-Star review. I'd really appreciate it! :)

    Here's the link to review The Service Revolver and How to Use It:
    http://www.lulu.com/shop/charles-d-...it/ebook/product-23483904.html#customerReview

    Thanks!

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
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  3. JAB

    JAB Well-Known Member

    May 6, 2010
    East Tennessee
    That sounds great! As a guy who prefers revolvers to semi-autos, generally speaking, I think I will enjoy that. As a person who often finds that he can shoot some guns better using some of the old, 'outdated' grips than using the newer, 'better' grips and stances currently approved by 'operators' who scoff at those older ways I bet I will even learn something (more likely a lot.)
     
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  4. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    For two-handed grip, he teaches a low style thumb-wrapping-the-lead-hand-wrist grip. He also teaches the "whole hand squeeze" trigger technique which most folks now associate with Fairbairn. At less than 15 yards or so, ims, he was interested in combat accuracy more than pinpoint target shooting. Long range shooting was a different story.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  5. JAB

    JAB Well-Known Member

    May 6, 2010
    East Tennessee
    My mom shot handguns with her off hand gripping the wrist of her shooting hand. To be more precise, she would wrap her off hand around the wrist joint, the area of her arm just behind the joint and the very back portion of her shooting hand with her off hand thumb right across the top of the wrist joint. I showed her other grip methods but she had been shooting handguns that way her entire life and couldn't get used to another way. Because of her, just out of curiosity, I have tried that grip, myself. I think that the 'off hand wrapped around the front of the shooting hand' grip probably works better for most semiautos but for revolvers the 'grip the wrist' style, if done right, does have merit. In fact, as it helps stabilize the wrist and eliminates any risk of the off-hand thumb getting in the way of the cylinder gap I believe the argument could be made that, at least for some people, gripping the wrist is the superior method of shooting a revolver. However, since most people today use both revolvers and semiautos (if they use revolvers, at all) it seems to make sense to train to grip them the same.
     
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  6. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    I'm not one of those guys who craps on people who do it different. If it works for them then it works.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  7. RAT76

    RAT76 Well-Known Member

    Thanks Kirk. Took me a while to get it downloaded (slow internet connection at my end) but well worth it.
     
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