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A dialog in another thread made me limp down memory lane.

I remember when you searched the internet using Gopher, when you chatted online using IRC and Usenet.

I remember the first computer I owned was made by Commodore. I remember what it felt like to watch characters pop up on the screen individually because my connection was powered by a 300 baud modem. I remember when Kermit was both a muppet AND a transfer program/protocol. I remember when I had to wait hours to log on to the local dial-in BBS to chat (even before IRC and Usenet), or download programs. I remember the good/contributing citizen requirements for BBS's before you could access some functionality.

I remember when a computer virus was written by bored kids and the equivalent of vandals instead of by organized crime.

I remember when it was a big deal to have a monitor capable of showing more than one color or a computer that could make some sound other than "beeeeep" and no one had an internal hard disk on their PC because those were the size of a small dish-washer and only Universities and the gvt could afford them but, hey, that's OK because that single-sided floppy disk gave you everything you needed anyway. And the cool guys had TWO floppy disk drives!

I remember using an audio-cassette tape for data storage. It was slow but cheap and ubiquitous.

I remember the rise of Microsoft and the fact (FACT I tell you!) that 640K is all you'll ever need and that you booted to DOS then typed "win" to get a new-fangled GUI.

I remember using PCTOOLS and other data recovery tools to get back lost sectors on floppy disks and using a hole-punch to make double sided disks out of singles.

There's a lot of crap that I remember from the bad-o'-days.

Oh, and one more thing: GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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A dialog in another thread made me limp down memory lane.

I remember when you searched the internet using Gopher, when you chatted online using IRC and Usenet.

I remember the first computer I owned was made by Commodore. I remember what it felt like to watch characters pop up on the screen individually because my connection was powered by a 300 baud modem. I remember when Kermit was both a muppet AND a transfer program/protocol. I remember when I had to wait hours to log on to the local dial-in BBS to chat (even before IRC and Usenet), or download programs. I remember the good/contributing citizen requirements for BBS's before you could access some functionality.

I remember when a computer virus was written by bored kids and the equivalent of vandals instead of by organized crime.

I remember when it was a big deal to have a monitor capable of showing more than one color or a computer that could make some sound other than "beeeeep" and no one had an internal hard disk on their PC because those were the size of a small dish-washer and only Universities and the gvt could afford them but, hey, that's OK because that single-sided floppy disk gave you everything you needed anyway. And the cool guys had TWO floppy disk drives!

I remember using an audio-cassette tape for data storage. It was slow but cheap and ubiquitous.

I remember the rise of Microsoft and the fact (FACT I tell you!) that 640K is all you'll ever need and that you booted to DOS then typed "win" to get a new-fangled GUI.

I remember using PCTOOLS and other data recovery tools to get back lost sectors on floppy disks and using a hole-punch to make double sided disks out of singles.

There's a lot of crap that I remember from the bad-o'-days.

Oh, and one more thing: GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
I remember my first computer, an Apple II+ with green screen, tractor-feed printer, and dual 5.25" floppy drives.

I remember playing Oregon Trail back before you could actually aim your gun when hunting (you just had to hit the space bar at the right time as game bounded in front of you). I remember playing Lode Runner and thinking it was going to be hard for anyone to make a better video game.

I remember a few years later being SysOp of a multi-node BBS and sending an email via FidoNET and being excited when the response arrived within three days. I remember accessing Tymnet illicitly.

I remember using the ALT-255 character in directory names to hide my "elite" files from my dad on the PC's hard drive. I remember setting up elaborate menus to run all of my important programs, using ridiculously long batch files.

I remember going to a hacker convention in Atlanta and helping some other guys hide the pirate radio transmitter before the FCC thugs who showed up at the con triangulated its exact position (the metal hotel roof we had the aerial clamped to may have made it tougher for them).
 

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Yeah, I remember a lot of that stuff too. 5 megabyte drum packs 12" across and 3" thick, etc. Paul Allen and I were at WSU at the same time.

Dang, I REALLY pledged the wrong frat!! :eek: 2 blocks down the street, and...

I just bought a new external drive last week. WD Passport. Just a touch bigger than a deck of cards. USB3, 2.5 inch format.

2,000,000 megabytes!! (2 terabytes) $200!
 

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I remember askin mom if we would ever have computers, she said no!!!
I remember playing pong, asked mom would.nt it be neat if there were games that looked like cartoons, nope agian!!!
 

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A dialog in another thread made me limp down memory lane.

I remember when you searched the internet using Gopher, when you chatted online using IRC and Usenet.

I remember the first computer I owned was made by Commodore. I remember what it felt like to watch characters pop up on the screen individually because my connection was powered by a 300 baud modem. I remember when Kermit was both a muppet AND a transfer program/protocol. I remember when I had to wait hours to log on to the local dial-in BBS to chat (even before IRC and Usenet), or download programs. I remember the good/contributing citizen requirements for BBS's before you could access some functionality.

I remember when a computer virus was written by bored kids and the equivalent of vandals instead of by organized crime.

I remember when it was a big deal to have a monitor capable of showing more than one color or a computer that could make some sound other than "beeeeep" and no one had an internal hard disk on their PC because those were the size of a small dish-washer and only Universities and the gvt could afford them but, hey, that's OK because that single-sided floppy disk gave you everything you needed anyway. And the cool guys had TWO floppy disk drives!

I remember using an audio-cassette tape for data storage. It was slow but cheap and ubiquitous.

I remember the rise of Microsoft and the fact (FACT I tell you!) that 640K is all you'll ever need and that you booted to DOS then typed "win" to get a new-fangled GUI.

I remember using PCTOOLS and other data recovery tools to get back lost sectors on floppy disks and using a hole-punch to make double sided disks out of singles.

There's a lot of crap that I remember from the bad-o'-days.

Oh, and one more thing: GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
I remember when!! If you wanted A Computer, You had to design it and build it. That was before personal Computers. I designed and built my own in 1965. 2k rom 4k ram with a tape cassette for storage external battery and a modal 15 teletype for a printer. They lost me when Bill Gates went to Windows.
 

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Strange, I just had this conversation with one of my kids!

I can vaguely remember "gopher." We have a very old Apple upstairs-- have to check on what it is; any money in them as "antiques" today?

Wasn't there some sort of process to "mount" CD's on a computer? maybe thru DOS?

The army of the 80's was still back in the 70's. We had an old mainframe that took punch cards to track ammo inventory. We actually had an operator for the punch card machine. Considering every time you moved ammo you had to turn in a form that was turned into a punch card that was run every evening as a "batch" we never could understand why the IG could never understand why our inventory reports were always 24 hours out of date.

Maybe unrelated, but we had a teletype machine in our office to receive instructions from Rock Island and one fax machine on whole the base. To use that fax you had to get the adjutants permission.
 

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I remember when I was first introduced to a computer in college. We programmed in machine language. No, not assembly, ... machine language. We would be entering things like: B4,3C,76,12,EF, etc. Then someone introduced us to this new fangled time-saver thing called an "assembler". Wow, what a neat high-end tool! We no longer had to carry those little pocket cards where we could look up and manually type in the machine code for something like "clear accumulator".

5-1/4" floppies! Ha! Mine were 8" and held less than 100k of data. Of course, back in those days, you could send a man to the moon and still not need all of that 100k of storage for your programs.
 

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I remember my first one around 1986, Commodore Amiga 1000. I used it to play SubLogic Flight Simulator on it all the time. I kept that PC for several years and in 1988 Started running a BBS service on it called The Airport out of Ventura, CA. I had a 4mb memory module addon and 2 SCSI Apple external 20 GB drives hanging off the expansion bus. I moved on in 1992 to a 486 PC with 1mb of ram in it. Thought that was the hot thing back then along with a USR HST 9600 Dual Standard modem!

Geez I could keep going on and on with this.. great memories!
 

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My parents were not too keen on a computer, thinking a typewriter was more useful to a kid in school. So while I had a bit of access at the schools and other kid's places, mostly I did without until a junior in highschool, when I got my 386 from gateway. Back then gateway was the stuff, and it was a great machine that lasted most of my college career and was still running, in use by my granddad, in the 2000's. Grandpa used it to email his ship mates from ww2 and get some basic news and such. After that we tore it down for parts, keeping the 5 inch drive in case someone found an old disk or something.

Ah... the bad old days. Lets see...
lynx was for the web, all text based and slow. Dialup was the name of the game, and after a while trumpet winsock and netscape gave you a 1 page per hour experience on the newly created internet. Gopher was still used but mostly for the university library stuff or internal networks.

Adlib sound card could only play music, not speech, and talking games sounded like your roommate was drunk and stuffed headfirst into a barrel of styrofoam peanuts.

Dos was the OS, 6.2 or 6.0. You had to poke and prod third party software to manage the memory of the system so you could do anything interesting. Windows ran in 256 colors and ran on top of dos, it was insanely slow. The math coprosser was external to the CPU, and cost a lot, I did not have one so floating point was done by integer magic(slow!).

Ram was 4 MB after a few upgrades. I think it started with 1 or 2 mb.
Hard disk was huge, at 120 MB.

I remember hacking floppy filesystems to get 2 MB onto a 1.44 MB floppy (unstable, data loss ensued).

I remember bulletin boards --- dialup places to hang out --- before the web took off. games and social sites mostly.

I remember some awesome games. Wolfenstein 3d. Pool of radience. Tie fighter / xwing series. Elite plus. Doom/quake/heretic. So many others. Turn based strategy (warlords, heroes).

I remember the school mac classics, B&W screen, tiny screen, all in one computers that could do nothing much beyond word processing or some cool but cheezy games. Res-edit let you past the security :p

Lol SUN sparc stations. NEXT. The suns had an optical mouse but it only worked on a tiny 3 inch square pad, get off the pad, no more mouse. NEXT tried to bridge windows and unix, and failed badly. SGI --- not exactly unix, they cost a ton and did very little really, and were extremely difficult to use. IRIX was cool in its own way but took a degree in unix from SGIU (a joke) to make it do anything right.

HAHAHA mainframes. They used to use special computers called mainframes that were persnickity, unstable, and frustrating to work on.

I think I will stop there. Somethings make me nostalgic. Stuff like this... makes me glad we have moved on.
 

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5-1/4" floppies! Ha! Mine were 8" and held less than 100k of data. Of course, back in those days, you could send a man to the moon and still not need all of that 100k of storage for your programs.
LOL... The original Space shuttles basically ran on the equivalent of 5 Commodore 128s. :eek:

I fondly remember running a FL West Coast node of a Commodore BBS network that kept the entire State in touch on my SX-64 (the Briefcase Commodore) with only 5 Days of down-time in 5 Years.

The SX was great for Pirate... err... Achiving parties.
Daisy-Chain 6 64s together and let 'em rip!


 

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I labored long and hard to be come proficient in DOS. Then along came windows and made computer life easier. My first computer used a tape drive and a TV for a monitor. My first "real" computer did not have a hard drive, it had a 20 Megabye hard card. I never did fill it. Now the simplist program is larger then that hard card capacity, Memory cost you $100 per megabyte. I assembled three or four computers over the years. It got too easy to buy one all ready put together and working.
The first effort at computing at work was a large main frame at the Little Rock Headquarters that read punch cards. We were sent a "Port a Punch" a plastic gizcmo that held a punch card and allowed us to punch out the blocks with a stylus. Things surely have come a long way, and we will see much more in the future.

Life is short, be happy
Jack

Just recently added 2 more gig of Ram to this machine, and changed OS to windows 7 home premium. Should hold me for a few more years.
 

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Joining this forum is my first experience using a computer outside of work neccessity. The only places I would go was the property appraisers' office and the building department. Other than that I'm a novice.
 

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My first was a Commodore 16 (yep... sixteen... predated the 64) connected to a tiny black and white TV and a audio cassette drive.

I helped write parts of Shoals Community College's BBS, ran it for almost three months, and used a 9600 baud 3 line modem and a Wyse 286 to run my OWN BBS, The Iron Gauntlet, for almost 9 months. (STILL have the Wyse 286, and yes, it still works fine!)

I didn't build my first computer until 2005, and haven't looked back since.

Cy
 

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My first was a Commodore 16 (yep... sixteen... predated the 64) connected to a tiny black and white TV and a audio cassette drive.

I helped write parts of Shoals Community College's BBS, ran it for almost three months, and used a 9600 baud 3 line modem and a Wyse 286 to run my OWN BBS, The Iron Gauntlet, for almost 9 months. (STILL have the Wyse 286, and yes, it still works fine!)

I didn't build my first computer until 2005, and haven't looked back since.

Cy
You're making me miss my old Vic20 that I had hooked up to my Ham radios....
 

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Remember buying "Franklin" as a word processor and having to set the jumper before use, then removing whenever you wanted to play pong? Makes my brain hurt to remember what I went through to get on the Internet. $2500.00 for my first Apple II.

Bill
 

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My first computer was programed with switches and jumper cables. Next was punch tape, then data cards!
 
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