Cor bon +p hollow point 115 gr

Discussion in 'P-11 & P-40' started by historybuff, Jul 26, 2020.

  1. historybuff

    historybuff Active Member

    363
    Mar 11, 2009
    Does anyone have any practical experience with these?
    The gun shop actually had 9mm in stock-- this was what was available and I have never used them. I grabbed 2 boxes so I would have some, plus other practice ammo.
    Will +p shoot high? Any chambering or ejection problems? Any other interesting comments?
    Obviously I will get to the range and try this stuff out.
     
  2. Yankee_Rebel

    Yankee_Rebel Active Member

    42
    Apr 6, 2020
    Watch for case bulging in the area of feed ramp. They have worked in my P-11. I got just short of 2 one gallon water jugs of penetration, which is a bit marginal, imo. The bullets tended to fragment in the water jugs, with the core remaining intact and the jacket separating and fragmenting.
     

  3. Texasbubba

    Texasbubba Member

    34
    Dec 27, 2014
    Cor Bon was one of the first companies to bring +P loads to the general shooter market.
    They've been around a long time and their loads have a good record. The 115 grain loads come out of a 4" bbl around 1,300fps.
     
  4. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    I thought that was Super Vel back in the '70s, though there have been some people who've looked at published velocity data from the '50s and '60s and concluded that those loads must have been above the current SAAMI max pressure.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  5. Texasbubba

    Texasbubba Member

    34
    Dec 27, 2014
    Super Vel was out there, but Cor Bon had better marketing and survived.
    And yes +P means just that above average pressure. That's why the big name manufacturers limited their +P sales to LE. They couldn't control what sort of cheap POS that the ammunition was going to be used in and didn't want the liability.
     
  6. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    Super Vel closed because they couldn't meet customer demand because the large manufacturers stopped selling them components (brass cases). They did this because Super Vel was eating into their business. You see, Super Vel was extremely popular, got glowing reviews in the press, and was a preferred supplier for LEO and certain federal agencies. Super Vel fell behind in taxes and closed doors in 1974 and was auctioned off in 1975. There was nothing wrong with Super Vel's "marketing." They were a victim of their own success.

    Cor Bon, on the other hand, didn't open until 1982, nearly full decade after Super Vel closed.

    Cor Bon's survival had nothing to do with Super Vel's demise. The two are unrelated.

    I've heard that claim before but I don't think it can be supported by the actual evidence. More of an Urban Myth shooters tell each other.

    Based on a quick survey of published load data and published velocities, I'd say that there's a fair chance that a certain percentage of loads from the '50's and '60s are, in fact, popping over the current SAAMI max for standard pressure. In particular I have access to a 1967 Lyman Reloading Handbook and there are a few loads in the pistol cartridges that definitely match up velocities with modern +P. One in particular was a .380ACP load that velocity definitely hits nearly the same as the <cough> "+P" velocity claimed by Buffalo Bore. (BB "+P" = 95 gr HC @ 1125 fp/s : 1967 Lyman = 95 gr FMJ @ 1155 using max load of 4.5 gr Unique).

    Personally, I think it comes from the "Law Enforcement Only" branding on the box which really was only a marketing ploy. At worst, a lawyer-ism.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  7. canonsix

    canonsix Well-Known Member

    452
    Nov 17, 2004
    Billings,Mt
    IKLAWSON, I remember using a 357 load from the 70's of a 158 gr Thompson gas check semiwadcutter on top of 15.5 grains of 2400, that was from a reloading manual of the day.My how time have changed.
     
    Tex Ohfive and lklawson like this.
  8. lklawson

    lklawson Well-Known Member Supporter

    Oct 13, 2009
    Huber Heights, OH
    It's a good thing bullet technology has improved so much. We get a ton more performance with a lot less pressure, powder, and wear-n-tear on our guns. :)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  9. Gliderguy

    Gliderguy Member

    24
    Jan 28, 2020
    Often light bullets come out of a handgun hitting low because they clear the barrel so fast. Heavy for caliber bullets often hit high because they are in the barrel a millisecond or so more, and a little bit more muzzle flip has happened.
     
  10. historybuff

    historybuff Active Member

    363
    Mar 11, 2009
    I finally got to the range with these. Not surprisingly they worked just fine but I needed to find that out for sure. No large change to POI that I could tell (which is good; I also practice with 115 grain bullets), but I still need to get back in practice.

    I was happy that my shooting improved after the last time I shot, snap caps really helped.

    I shot enough that I got tired and my concentration went out so I switched to a .22 revolver. I know that some guys love recoil, but I find that the p11 is small and light enough that it effects me over time. I don't think a p40 is in my future but kudos to guys who are good with them.
     
    HatRon56 likes this.
  11. Tex Ohfive

    Tex Ohfive Well-Known Member

    102
    Feb 22, 2020
    Wyoming
    I used this load ( 15.5 gr of 2400 ) behind a cast 150 gr SWC in a 6" Colt Mark III Trooper .357 to take my first deer. I got that load from either my Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook or my beloved Speer #8 manual ( hottest loads ever published! ). That was my high end load. My standard plinking load was 4.5 gr of Bullseye behind the same cast bullet. I still have and cherish my Mark III Trooper. I polished and tuned the action on that revolver so it feels just like firing a fine Python. :)