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As I live in Daytona Beach, I ride whenever the option and time permits.  The terrain is mostly flat and makes for a pleasurable deviation.
The bike is a Public D1 single speed (i.e. no gears).  
 

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torrent said:
. . . clipping in can get you killed in traffic.  Stick with platforms and you will live longer.
Gotta call "BS" on this one, sorry!  This seems to be a misconception mostly limited to inexperienced cyclists.  If you try them, I believe you will discover that modern pedal and cleat combinations release your foot with a slight twist that generally happens automatically when you suddenly need to put down a foot.

Usually, you will find that the increased stability keeping your foot on the pedal as you traverse bumps, railroad tracks, and other pavement or trail surface irregularities you encounter makes the bicycle easier to control.  Yeah, YMMV, but most experienced riders share my opinion.   ;)
 

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mountain kid, you are a crazy man. downhilling? OMG.
i'm a bike nut too. i have 4 mountain bikes and 2 road bikes. I have clip in spds on all of them.if i'm not locked in my feet are wiggling around everywhere and coming off the pedals on bumps rocks and roots.
when i bought my carbon stump jumper i had to justify buying yet another bike. i told my wife "i couldn't afford an aluminum bike so i just bought a carbon fiber." Also have a trek, gary fischer, and intense.
I quit riding motorcycles years ago cause i couldn't behave myself, but the bad habits followed to the mountain bikes too. finally figured out 2 months of rehab every year was cutting in to my biking time so i'm trying to turn over a new leaf. I thought road biking might be safer, but not. These idiots will knock you off the road down here. one day i may fire back!!!
 

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dougc541 said:
I thought road biking might be safer, but not. These idiots will knock you off the road down here. one day i may fire back!!!
Even the well meaning folks can be a hazard.  Last summer, an elderly lady had a stroke and veered into a group of 8 young guys who were out on a training ride.  After the impact, the largest piece of the carbon bike ridden by the kid who got hurt most seriously was about 8 inches long.  What we need is some bad looking dudes on Harley's to run interference.    ;)

Out on the trails, this old guy rides his Scalpel pretty conservatively, especially after my wife broke her collar bone and a tibia in the same fall a couple of years ago.  I don't bounce as well as I once did.   ::)

Haven't personally had any problems with aggressive drivers.  Arizona has a no permit required for concealed carry, sometimes referred to as "constitutional carry", law.  That bulge under my jersey is usually a .40 S&W Kahr and sometimes a 1911.  With so many people carrying, drivers are generally a little more polite.   ;D
 

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I just took my old Huffy mountain bike out and prepped it for this summers riding. It's so old that it has a Made in USA label on it. :eek:
Since gas here is now at $4.34.9/gallon, it's going to get a lot of use this summer. >:(
 

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TucsonMTB said:
[quote author=torrent link=1302372086/0#5 date=1302559453] . . . clipping in can get you killed in traffic.  Stick with platforms and you will live longer.
Gotta call "BS" on this one, sorry!  This seems to be a misconception mostly limited to inexperienced cyclists.  If you try them, I believe you will discover that modern pedal and cleat combinations release your foot with a slight twist that generally happens automatically when you suddenly need to put down a foot.

Usually, you will find that the increased stability keeping your foot on the pedal as you traverse bumps, railroad tracks, and other pavement or trail surface irregularities you encounter makes the bicycle easier to control.  Yeah, YMMV, but most experienced riders share my opinion.   ;) [/quote]
I'm going to have to say you are wrong here, not that your statemtent is wrong, but we are comparing apples to oranges. My above statement was made while thinking of riding a commuter bike through a city or on a college campus. Traffic congestion in those places causes slower driving speeds. Try picturing a 20-something in everyday clothes commuting between classes. An experienced cyclist doesn't want to change his shoes every hour or so just to ride his bike. I did it for five years...


And for the 6+ mph they will give you for extended distances they are absolutley the only way to go.
I agree completely. But that's not what I was talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Well, im glad this generated some discussion. Ive just thrown a set of platforms on it that I had laying around since my wallet is still recouping from the bike cost, but I do plan on putting clipless pedals on eventually.

Having a tough time deciding what to go with however. I think what Ive decided on is a set of chromoloy BEBOP pedals, with http://compare.ebay.com/like/220758...FixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&_lwgsi=yThese ebay titanium spindles. That would get me into a Ti pedal for less than ~$150.

Really im at somewhat of a loss when it comes to this road bike business though. Anyone suggest a good roadie forum to read up on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
TucsonMTB said:
[quote author=mtnkid85 link=1302372086/15#26 date=1306736209]Really im at somewhat of a loss when it comes to this road bike business though.  Anyone suggest a good roadie forum to read up on?
http://forums.roadbikereview.com/ [/quote]

Thanks Tucson, just through my google searches Ive been reading a bit on that one as well as the weightweenies.com forum. Tons of info out there on every little part!
 

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mtnkid85 said:
Well, im glad this generated some discussion.  Ive just thrown a set of platforms on it that I had laying around since my wallet is still recouping from the bike cost, but I do plan on putting clipless pedals on eventually.

Having a tough time deciding what to go with however.  I think what Ive decided on is a set of chromoloy BEBOP pedals, with http://compare.ebay.com/like/220758...FixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&_lwgsi=yThese ebay titanium spindles.  That would get me into a Ti pedal for less than ~$150.

Really im at somewhat of a loss when it comes to this road bike business though.  Anyone suggest a good roadie forum to read up on?
+1 on the roadbikereview forum. They are tied into mtbr.com which is a great mountain bike forum. I've been road biking lately but still dream about single tracks. Since I'm not a racer, I picked up a lot of my new road gear at nashbar.com & performance bikes. I went straight into some basic clipless from nashbar for $35 & couldn't be more happier.
 

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rockymtn said:
+1 on the roadbikereview forum. They are tied into mtbr.com which is a great mountain bike forum. I've been road biking lately but still dream about single tracks.   Since I'm not a racer, I picked up a lot of my new road gear at nashbar.com & performance bikes. I went straight into some basic clipless from nashbar for $35 & couldn't be more happier.  
Yep!  I believe, SIDI brand mountain bike shoes are sleek enough for the road too.  And, in the hotter weather, SPD sandals rock!  :D
 

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Here's my ride:



1988 Schwinn Premis, purchased new. Weighs 22 lbs. I recently replaced the Aero I bars with regular drop bars... with white tape instead of the 80's teal. Live in a more urban setting now than when I first bought it, so there's not really much use for the arms-forward riding position. Has a Columbus Tenax frame, Biopace chainring, Selle Italia seat, Weinmann 700c wheels, and the très chic white Dia-Compe Aero-Compe Brakes, Sakae FX cranks, and Suntour Cyclone shifters and dérailleurs. I also have some Sampson Stratics pedals for it. This bike could be a museum of 80's cycling technology.  ;D

Once upon a time, I thought about trading it up to a more modern bike, but after seeing what new bikes are going for nowadays... I think I'll just stick with my Premis. Prices have shot up to unjustifiable levels, IMO. I mean, just crazy expensive. To buy a modern bike of comparable quality to my Premis would probably cost in the neighborhood of $1000, and I can't see any reason for that at all. The only things not up to par with my vintage ride are those blasted downtube shifters, and I'll cope with those.

Plus, I've yet to see a modern bike that can hold a candle to the beauty of my Premis. It's just gorgeous, if I do say so myself. Looks even better with the white-taped drop bars.
 

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Syndil said:
The only things not up to par with my vintage ride are those blasted downtube shifters, and I'll cope with those.
Bar end shifters from that same era would be almost as convenient as the current brake/shift lever arrangement. Back in the late 70's, I raced with bar end shifters. They seemed to offer a significant advantage. When I quit racing, I turned to down tube shifters for ease of maintenance, but . . . bar ends rock!   :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I love it!
But I must say the rockin teal kinda makes it what it is! I hope youve still got the matching water bottle, you just dont see teal these days. ;D

Syndil said:
Here's my ride:



1988 Schwinn Premis... This bike could be a museum of 80's cycling technology.  ;D

Plus, I've yet to see a modern bike that can hold a candle to the beauty of my Premis. It's just gorgeous, if I do say so myself. Looks even better with the white-taped drop bars.
 

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When I lived in Japan, I rode to work (USAF) almost every day as long as it wasn't pouring buckets. Bike commuting has been a way of life over there for a long time. Some folks ride one bike to the train station, take the train to downtown Tokyo and have another bike at that station to ride the rest of the way to work. When I moved to Aridzona, my commute became 26 miles and with temps in the 100's in the summer, I gave it up (and gained 26 lbs!)

My commuter bike in Japan was a cheap mountain bike with slicks but my road bike was a sweet Paramount that I used to explore the countryside on the weekends.

herkyeng
 
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