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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, my wife and I got incredible news yesterday. We are having our first child, a BOY, in early July.

My question is, what firearm would you recommend as a child's first? I'm thinking about a savage rascal (I think it's called a rascal) or maybe a cricket single shot. I'm open to pretty much anything.

It's awful early but I think it'd be pretty cool to have a gun that I bought while he was still in mommy's belly that I can give to him when he's old enough.
 

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My little girl is only four and she's already going to receive at least 2 guns I've set aside. Little .22 mag revolver when she fly's the nest, and a .223 bolt gun for her first hunt. If she interested, around 6 I plan to introduce her to a cricket or rascal as well. She's already asking what daddy does at the range.
And we've got her trained to go find and tell an adult at the sight of a firearm left unattended.
 

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Maybe a Henry Lever action in .22 LR. Nice easy gun to run, it won't kick too much, and it'll allow for some fundamentals.
 

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I think a single shot, CO2 pellet rifle in a scaled down size is a good starter. It's cheap to shoot, less lethal, and teaches fundamentals. You can probably shoot in your back yard, maybe even indoors. That's a terrific convenience and you don't have to take a young child to a busy, noisy range.

Single shots are the way to go. It takes a little time to go through the loading and firing cycle which gives the child's brain time to process everything and understand all the elements involved.

There are several child rifles on the market that are good, single shot 22s. Mossberg makes one with a plug for the magazine port making it a single shot. When the child is ready, the plug can be replaced with a 10 round mag. A break barrel single is another option.

Here's an article worth perusing:

https://gothunts.com/your-kids-first-22-rifle/
 

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I like the youth break action rifles. They have short Lop's and only hold 1 round. You have complete control over ammo. I like to start them on .22 shorts for the only reason that if they do well, we can graduate up to the long rifle. A bit of early encouragement.

The other thing I do is 'The 4 Rules' with the fourth being 'keep the booger hook off the boom switch'. Teach a kid the rules. Ask them in a bit what the rules are. They remember the booger one. It works because it is gross.
 

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Single shots are the way to go. It takes a little time to go through the loading and firing cycle which gives the child's brain time to process everything and understand all the elements involved.
I like the youth break action rifles. They have short Lop's and only hold 1 round.
+1 for the single shots. I have an old stevens model 15 that works good for a starter gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. This is definitely down the road, considering he's not even due for another 4ish months.

I was definitely leaning towards a single shot to start with, for the exact reasons stated. Having control over ammo type, and pace at which it's shot. Though, I really like the idea of a pellet gun since I have a long enough basement and my backyard ends in woods. Plus a pellet gun means dad gets some trigger time too.

Lastly, a Henry might be just the ticket for something like a 10th birthday or some other occasion. I know they make quality firearms and that could be kind of an 'heirloom'.

Maybe I'll just get them all! Awesome feedback guys. Thanks a ton.
 

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I like the youth break action rifles. They have short Lop's and only hold 1 round. You have complete control over ammo.
My first firearm was an Iver Johnson break 410. I still have it. As a kid, I hunted with it a lot. It's small pattern, short range and a single shot made me learn to pick shots and make them count. I remember crawling geese in a canal along a rice field with a shell in the chamber, one in my left hand on the forearm, and one in my mouth. Got off all 3.
 

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My first was and still is, a Remington single shot .22 that my brother an I bought with our cotton picking money when we were about 15 and 16. Prior to that we had been allowed to shoot Dad's single shot 20 gauge. Brother has it, and I have the 22. In my younger days, I would spend a lot of time just shooting at things with the .22. At one time I could cut playing cards with it. Probably have a problem hitting it full face now. LOL.
 
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Goo, one thing about the Henry, they make great guns that last. First guns need to be small. Unless you want a really nice gun that is only good for a few years each generation, I'd go with a low dollar short stocked gun for the first, and a Henry when the skeletal system is 80% or so done growing.

Lop

Oh, and I'm not sure, but it might not be wise to present a gun RIGHT after someone went thru labor.
 

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A nice "little" single shot 22 lr is ideal. Shorts, longs, long rifle, then High velocity long rifle. It takes time to develop the sound foundation of safety and basic marksmanship. Instill a strong foundation when young they will keep it their whole life.
By starting out with this basic platform the child has goals to work towards. Don't rush, patience is another gift that too many parents don't give their children anymore.
 

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A 10/22 is a great choice. The single shot .22s, not so much. After a year or two, they sit in a closet. Sure, people pass them down or they get sold at a pawn shop. Buy something your child can keep and use forever.

You can control ammo and rate of fire by only putting in one round at a time. A single shot hunting shotgun or rifle might be a good choice.

I have two teenage boys, started both off with BB guns at 4 or 5, they were shooting .22s by 6, carbines by 8 and 9mms by 10. For their 12 year old birthdays, they each got a box of parts and built their own AR15s. They both shoot competitively and hunt, so they each have several guns now. Rimfire Challenge is a great place to start them when they can hold up a .22 pistol and rifle, but a single shot won't fly.
 

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I like to start them on .22 shorts for the only reason that if they do well, we can graduate up to the long rifle.
As a kid, I often bought shorts because they were cheaper than LR and killed squirrels and rabbits just as dead, plus they were quieter. They were like 50 cents a box in the 60s. Now, shorts are more expensive. Go figure. Supply and demand, I suppose.
 

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My daughter has a daisy pellet/bb rifle. She's 8, and I started her a couple years ago. Watched a lot of eddy eagle videos and we talk gun safety a lot. She's old enough now that Eddie eagle is dorky, but we go through a lot of what if scenarios. We plink with the daisy at my work or in the garage a lot, and she has gotten to fire my .410 and a .22 on the rare occasions when we get outdoors to shoot with my brothers, but she's not big enough for the indoor range yet. She's got to build a lot more upper arm strength before we will move past the daisy on a regular basis.
 

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To differ with some. Single shot 22, cricket or savage etc. Yes they will grow out of them, quickly. But many will say the slow process will build the best mechanics. Plus as mentioned you can get some great deals on them at pawn shops. That I know for sure.

Gary
 

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I must be weird (that's a rhetorical statement buddy :)). I still haven't outgrown my single shot yet and still shoot it regularly.
 
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At age 9, I received a Winchester Model 62A .22 S/L/LR pump for Christmas. It was used as my family had little money for luxuries. I learned safety protocol from my 9 year old friend who's family were gun owners. I still shoot that same gun today. My son also learned to shoot with it when he was young and it was the perfect gun to start out with. It will become his when I am done having fun with it (translation=when I am dead).
 
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