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Discussion Starter #1
I want to put a bipod on my sub2k. I was thinking about a Harris style. But in an effort to keep the weapon as compact as possible I would like to find a smaller/more compact bipod.
Any suggestions?
 

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I really don't recommend a bipod with the Sub period. It tends to place upward pressure on the pivot block when using one. But this is just my opinion. I did use one on a couple trips to the range when I got my first Sub, but haven't used it on there since. As for what model to recommend, I really can't be much help. Almost anything you use will be a little heavier than you would like. If I was absolutely determined to use one I think I might go with a cheap grip pod. That way you would have a forward vertical grip and bipod combined for what you prefer at the time.
 

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No real suggestions, just a couple of thoughts.

1. Could the folding mechanism from the SU-16 be adapted and used with the Sub front handguards??

2. Is there a bipod that would attach to the Kel-Tec "chin" rail on the Sub?
 

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I just ordered the low-profile UTG. My handgaurd is cut back to 6 inches with plans to adapt the Kel tec picatinny rail by notching out the area with the remaining forward screw. Hoping that moving the bipod back doesn't create a future problem as 3wb speculates.
 

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No real suggestions, just a couple of thoughts.

1. Could the folding mechanism from the SU-16 be adapted and used with the Sub front handguards??

2. Is there a bipod that would attach to the Kel-Tec "chin" rail on the Sub?
1. Doubtful.

2. Yes. Any picatinny rail mount bipod should fit the Kel-tec accessory rail. Some with plastic amounts may be a little too thick to slip on, but can be sanded down. This is what I had. A basic steel UTG bipod.
 

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I was going to put a bipod on mine, till I thought about the pressure it could put on the pivot block. And it's not like it'll ever be a tack-driving sniper rifle.
 

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Well we'll just see about that! I happen to have a whole bag of those parody thumbtacks. Once Soro is back up and running there'll be a range report. One shot-One tack. Oorah.
 

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merrel,

Would you consider a removable barrel clamp-on bipod? They are very light weight, and would not put undo strain on the rifle as you must remove them every time you store the rifle.

-----

And no, people, I am not back, yet; I just happened to be browsing today and thought the title, "Bipod", was interesting.

Godspeed to all.

Tron1
 

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I used an inexpensive clamp-on bipod I had lying around just to sight in my Sub2K after doing some work on the front sight.

I have the compact fore end, so plenty of barrel is exposed to clamp on to.

It seemed to work effectively to steady the gun for that one-time task, as an alternative to a bench rest or sand bags.

I don't intend to use a bipod otherwise. I don't need or expect the Sub2K to be that kind of precision shooter.
 

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Well I intend to hit bull at 200. That's what a reticle scope is for and I know I'm not steady enough without a bipod.
 

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Just don't "anchor" the bipod by pressing down on the fore end, which is how I always thought you were supposed to use a bipod. This downward pressure, in addition to the sharp blow from firing is what I fear may damage the pivot block.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
That is a very good point 3wbdriver. If the SUB2k is fired from a bipod then attention will need to be paid to what force the weapon is steadied on the bipod, and to what angle to weapon will recoil. However, I think that the weapon will be fine if this is remembered.
 

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Hello All,

Actually a bipod is only a substitute for the supporting arm, and applies no pressure in and of itself on the weapon.

The purpose of the bipod is merely to eliminate the small movements that occur when supporting a weapon with the hand/arm. It also provides some elevation to the muzzle - bipods can be, after all, quite tall, and not merely 6-9 inches high. This elevation can assist the shooter in overcoming obstacles that would otherwise hinder their view of the intended target.

Bipods normally do not exert pressure on the weapon, except in those cases where the weapon itself "jumps" repeatedly due to recoil. The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) and the M60 machine gun come to mind as good examples of these types of weapons. Both tend to "jump" and "creep" away from the initial firing position, thereby changing the point of aim considerably. The use of a bipod, with its "feet" firmly planted into the ground, helps the firer stay on target.

The Sub2000, being of light (comparatively speaking) and, more importantly, single recoil, should not suffer any damage to its hinge during firing using a bipod, especially if it is a forearm-mounted one. One way to mount the bipod as close as possible to the hinge would be to use a solid dual level scope riser that attaches to the forearm just forward of the hinge, yet places the bipod itself under the end of the forearm.

My earlier suggestion as to using a barrel clamp-on bipod was an attempt to reduce weight, while also being less cumbersome.

And, if you still have trepidation about the effects of the "jump" on the hinge, place a section of thick, duct tape-covered foam under the "feet" of the bipod; the foam would absorb some of the energy of the "jump" and reduce the impact.

I do hope this helps.

Tron1
 
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