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Is it safe to keep ammo in a trunk of a car when it gets hot or should i not leave ammo in my trunk
 

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It won't hurt it a bit. Like stated, there are plenty of places that getter hotter than the majority of the US and they don't have problems with ammo. I keep it in my black truck it the summer sun in south AL loaded in a firearm and have so safely for years. On the job, I have even seen ammo make it through some structure fires without detonating, though I have felt like I was in a gun fight before from several hundred rounds of shotgun shells going off in a fire.
 

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My truck has a little ammo for almost all my guns, have got out and forgot it to many times. Need to shoot it all up one of these days.

I do take my rifle hunting loads and put them up for the summer.
 

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I'm going to recommend that you send all your ammo to me for safe keeping, in a cool climate controlled environment. I will even make it a point to test fire some of it weekly to verify that it is still within acceptable standards, and send you a box or two every other month as needed.










As others have stated... yea, should be fine. But.... limit quantities in case of an accident or fire.
 

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Your ammo will be fine, the little heat from the sun on your truck will do nothing to the ammo. It will still go bang.
 

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Over a period of many years, or even decades, high environmental heat will tend to degrade the chemistry of your ammunition. It can lead to less reliable primer ignition and variable results in the powder.

If your ammo is less than a decade old, I wouldn't spare a single thought to it. It'll be fine. If you're "prepping," keep your ammo sealed and in a cool, dry place.

I've shot ammo stored in U.S. "home" conditions (non-air conditioned, in Missouri) that is decades and decades old. I just recently shot up some cheap .22LR ammo, generally considered to be the least reliable and most vulnerable type ammo, that was at least 25-30 years old. Even that had only a few failures to ignite.

I think you're probably OK. :)

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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Over a period of many years, or even decades, high environmental heat will tend to degrade the chemistry of your ammunition. It can lead to less reliable primer ignition and variable results in the powder.

If your ammo is less than a decade old, I wouldn't spare a single thought to it. It'll be fine. If you're "prepping," keep your ammo sealed and in a cool, dry place.

I've shot ammo stored in U.S. "home" conditions (non-air conditioned, in Missouri) that is decades and decades old. I just recently shot up some cheap .22LR ammo, generally considered to be the least reliable and most vulnerable type ammo, that was at least 25-30 years old. Even that had only a few failures to ignite.

I think you're probably OK. :)

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
If you are shooting surplus commie stuff like 7.62x54r or .30-06 from Greece, chances are you are shooting stuff more than a couple decades old.
 

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I have a several sealed tins of 7.62x25 tok ammo that is dated 1948 and have yet to have one fail to fire. It is also some of the cleanest although corrosive ammo I shoot.
 

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I've worked at a Naval Magazine Base and we used to inspect the ammo held in reserve for fleet use and the only problem we encountered was with steel case ammo which the US no longer uses. Temps aren't the problem, its the humidity. So storing in your car trunk isn't a problem even in AZ. As a matter of habit I generally shoot up my EDC ammo and reload with new stuff every 90 days. I've been doing that since the 60's and I'm still here so I guess it works. As for old ammo look for any with verdigris forming on the case as they will jam in the chamber and I won't even use them for training.
 

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If our OD green cans of 7.62 that we had tied to the outside of the turrets didn't cook off in Iraq, you'll have no problem here.
 

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I think that the cook-off temperature of modern gunpowder and primers is around 600 degrees F. Though it sometimes feels like 600 F in an all black car sitting all day in a sunny asphalt parking lot in July, I think that exceeding 150 or 155 is quite rare unless the car is on fire. If the car is on fire....yeah it is probably bad to have ammo in it. But otherwise, not an issue.
 
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