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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I try to go easy on my 40 S&W S2K with a can, as far as ammo energy is concerned. Right now I shoot Federal 165 gr hydro shok that has a value of 161,700 when you multiply bullet weight, 165gr, times fps (980) = 161,700. I have found some subsonic ammo that is 200gr bullet weight, with a fps of 800, which comes out to 160,000. Because the 200gr bullet is traveling at a slower speed, and giving a lower mass times velocity number, I would think that it should be less stressful on the gun. Am I right, or just full of waste matter? Thanks for your help. In the past, I have been told to stay away from the 180gr bullets, because they were said to be hard on the gun.
 

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Valid question. It being subsonic it probably won't be a problem. I am convinced the 180gr WWB I used had a contributing factor in the pivot block failure on the Space ModulatOr but that stuff wasn't subsonic either. I won't shoot anything heavier in 165gr anymore. But I haven't tried any subsonic ammo yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have been using the Winchester train and defend. 40 S&W 180 gr at 925 f/s suppressed with good success
Next week I am going to try out some Federal 135gr hollow points at 1190 fps which they call "reduced recoil" ammo. It has a power factor of 160,650 which is a little lower than the 165 gr Hydrashok (161,700). I am still a little worried about using the 180 gr ammo because of the bullet setback in the case. Will let you know how it works out.
 

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I cannot address this with specific regard to the K T 2000, as I am a novice in that respect. But your concerns are, IMHO, valid.

With regard to handguns at least, there is a lot of evidence suggesting the .40 S&W can be quite hard on what are actually 9 mm Parabellum guns and frames. It is a lot like using +p ammunition in othe calibers. It is okay, as long as one heeds the advice, if you want a magnum, buy a magnum. When Bill Jordan started this trend, by suggesting S&W could build K-frame "part-time" .357 Magnums, it was great, except that many forgot the "part-time" caution. I can only wonder if a parallel exists here with the K T 2000. 9 mm platform, yet a .40 S&W option.

In all of my .40 S&W handguns, I practice 98% + of the time with "softer" loads. This is one advantage handloaders can claim. It won't hurt to practice a bit with the "carry" load but don't overdo it. Even the best handguns such as rugged 226 Sigs suffer from too much exposure to hotter .40 S&W loads, as few guns are really purposed for this cartridge; most are adapted from the 9 mm platform, and apprently, to heck with the cumulative wear-and-tear.

Just a thought. . . . Hope it helps.

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I took my 40. S&W S2K to the range and used some of the Federal 135gr (low recoil) ammo and found the recoil to be nice and low. Now, I have been using the KT heavy bolt and the Sumo heavy charging handle for at least the last 6 months. Recoil is also light when using the Federal 165gr hydra shok at 980 fps. I would say that either ammo is a good bet to take it easy on your Subby, 6 of one, half a dozen of the other, with the 135gr being just a little lighter recoil. I don't feel like my subby is being hammered to death any more, like I did while running the 180gr ammo. Just my 2 cents, your results may vary.
 
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