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Police use flashlights a lot. I would venture a guess that they use them more frequently than guns. And if they are using a gun mounted flashlight as their primary flashlight, then that means the muzzle would be pointed right where the flashlight is pointed. Any accident or momentary brain fart could predictably result in a tragedy. I would hope that training/practice is "Do not use your gun mounted light as your primary flashlight".

There are many advantages to a gun mounted light. But there are some disadvantages (safety) too. I am not to the point where I'd say don't use gun mounted flashlights. But I consider them for experts only. Similar to my feelings about carrying cocked-n-locked. Not for the newbie firearm owner IMHO. Fine for an experienced, skilled, well-practiced shooter though.
 

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Police use flashlights a lot. I would venture a guess that they use them more frequently than guns. And if they are using a gun mounted flashlight as their primary flashlight, then that means the muzzle would be pointed right where the flashlight is pointed. Any accident or momentary brain fart could predictably result in a tragedy. I would hope that training/practice is "Do not use your gun mounted light as your primary flashlight".

There are many advantages to a gun mounted light. But there are some disadvantages (safety) too. I am not to the point where I'd say don't use gun mounted flashlights. But I consider them for experts only. Similar to my feelings about carrying cocked-n-locked. Not for the newbie firearm owner IMHO. Fine for an experienced, skilled, well-practiced shooter though.
Yup, kinda like old people getting the gas & brake pedal mixed up! Since I are an elderly person (by definition), something to think about!! Anyone can have an AD!!
 

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Good point. As I stated in another thread, I don't feel comfortable carrying a 1911 cocked and locked for the same reason. My full time carry guns are striker fired weapons and it just bothers me to have my 1911 hammer cocked during carry despite the fact that it has the back strap grip safety and trigger safety as well. Just my own comfort level. If I trained for it and it was my only carry gun, I might have a different opinion and have learned that master of arms, making it an automatic response based on acquired motor skills.
 

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Let me guess - the newspaper reporter in the Anti-gun state has no experience with weapon lights,neither likely the same for these KTOG posters? I would strongly suggest some actual related personal experience before speculation.

A lack of experience may play a part, but I train with four different types of light activation on different long and handguns. No ADs from me, anyone I shoot with or any compelling evidence. I am not shooting under life and death conditions, but why are we hearing about a limited trend in one questionable area?

Years ago, a newspaper reported on a trend of police security holsters failing in ground fights. The evidence was clear... In reality, the manufacturer got involved and pointed out the holsters were years past the recommended replace date and seemed to mostly happen to bigger guys using an offset adapter. Guess what - two departments with problems watched then evaporate?

To the original point, I actually thought this kind of reasoning seemed legitimate. After other people with experience explained they thought this was BS, I ordered an extension activation switch which fits under my trigger guard. After the first few dozen repetitions on my Glock 19, I was more confident that they are inherently low risk. Not zero risk, but really not a major concern.

I would love for someone with experience to opine.
 

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I dunno. I just don't like having my flashlight attached to my pistol for a few reasons:

1. I use my flashlight WAYYYYYY more than I'll ever have to use my pistol, so keeping them separate has wayyyyyy more advantages (to me, anyway);
2. Finding holsters to fit a specific pistol and mounted light combination can be a royal pain;
3. Never point your firearm at something you're not willing to destroy ... so, if you're going around with that pistol out and light on, you're sweeping whatever you're using that light to see, which may or may not prove to be a threat;
4. Close-range distances at which super-fast follow-up shots are necessary do not necessarily require a two-handed grip to be accurate and/or effective. The closer your target, the less time you generally need between shots to get back on-target, and the farther out, the slower your shots tend to be (if you're going for accuracy, which you generally should); if you're close enough to be within contact distance, you're not going to have a fully-extended, two-handed grip on that pistol anyway, or shouldn't, because you'll have it in closer to yourself for retention purposes, at which point a two-handed grip isn't as easy (or even possible) and thus the benefit of a weapon-mounted light is pretty well gone. Adequate training with a handheld light also helps a LOT in this regard.

As for whether or not the weapon-mounted lights CAUSE negligent discharges ... nope. Sorry, negligent discharges are exactly what they are: shots made as a result of negligent handling of a firearm. Same way people try to blame SERPA holsters or Glock-style triggers for ND's: lack of training, and people refusing to accept responsibility for their own actions (or surviving family members/peers not accepting the fact that their relative/buddy made a serious mistake). An outright bad design is one thing, but I don't think pistol-mounted lights CAUSE ND's ... although they do have their pitfalls, and it does create a smaller margin of error for those that may be careless.
 
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