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so i cleaned up my p11 today and loaded the magazine with snap caps. i thought that i had chambered one of the snap caps. but i had not and dry fired it twice. do you think it did permanent damage?
 

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Heck no. Just don't make a habit of it. We've all thought we had one more round and pulled the trigger on an empty. It ain't good, but it is sure not the end of the world.

Lop

Oh, btw, welcome to ktog. :)
 

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so i cleaned up my p11 today and loaded the magazine with snap caps. i thought that i had chambered one of the snap caps. but i had not and dry fired it twice. do you think it did permanent damage?
Nothing to worry about. This will usually only become a problem if you do it frequently.
 

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so i cleaned up my p11 today and loaded the magazine with snap caps. i thought that i had chambered one of the snap caps. but i had not and dry fired it twice. do you think it did permanent damage?
Your good man, you can get by with that here and there, just not all the time
 

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+1 from me what they said and welcome to the group. I like making new friends!
 

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one of the main problems with dryfire is the firing pin getting caught. whenever i break a p11 down i take a punch and put it on the end of the firing pin and move it a little back and forth. this lets me know its freely moving and not hung up.
 

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One thing I've noticed in dry fire threads is that nobody explains why it's not good to continually dry fire Kel-Tec pistols.
On the P11 as well as the PF9 and the second generation P32 and P3at, the firing pin is held in place by either a threaded hex socket (Allen head) set screw or hex socket button screw. This screw protrudes into the firing pin channel and into a "notch" in the firing pin. The threads on these screws run all the way to their ends. If the pistol is dry fired without a snap cap in place, the firing pin will fly farther foward than it would if a snap cap were in place to stop it. This will cause the rear of the firing pin's "notch" to slam into the retaining screw, which is threaded. If this is done many times, these threads can be deformed to the point that it may be impossible to remove the screw without damaging the threads in the slide.
 

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One thing I've noticed in dry fire threads is that nobody explains why it's not good to continually dry fire Kel-Tec pistols.
On the P11 as well as the PF9 and the second generation P32 and P3at, the firing pin is held in place by either a threaded hex socket (Allen head) set screw or hex socket button screw. This screw protrudes into the firing pin channel and into a "notch" in the firing pin. The threads on these screws run all the way to their ends. If the pistol is dry fired without a snap cap in place, the firing pin will fly farther foward than it would if a snap cap were in place to stop it. This will cause the rear of the firing pin's "notch" to slam into the retaining screw, which is threaded. If this is done many times, these threads can be deformed to the point that it may be impossible to remove the screw without damaging the threads in the slide.
Always heard of the evils of dry firing but never quite understood why.

Thanks for the first coherent explanation that I've encountered on the subject. Well done!
 

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It takes a lot to mess up the threads, a friend of mine bought a P11 and dry fired it all weekend. I broke his down along with mine and you could barely tell the difference in the firing pins. His threads were a little flattened out not much just a enough to see the difference. He said he has no idea how many times he dry fired it, just watched TV while he dry fired away. So as others have said not to worry by any means.
 

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It isn't so much messing up the threads per se. That is just a very visible symptom that it's happening, and yes, how much.

The real issues are that the impact can jar the screw loose, resulting in it backing out. In a Gen I, that just means you risk losing the firing pin, hopefully not straight back into your face.

In a Gen II, it will start by releasing tension on the extractor spring, so extraction problems will show up. Eventually you lose the extractor and firing pin unless you spot it and correct.

The biggest happens in both: Hammering against the threads can cause bits of the thread to come loose in the firing pin channel, and that debris would inhibit the free movement of the firing pin. If the firing pin resists moving forward, you get light strikes and misfires. You also get peening on the hammer face and the firing pin itself. If a shaved thread were to jam the firing pin in the forward position, it can light off the next round as the slide comes into battery, turning your P-11 into a slam firing full auto. That's an extreme scenario, and it would take a lot to get there, but it's possible.
 

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Before i read that you was'nt to dryfire a p11, i had already dryfired mine hundreds of times.

When i detail stripped it, it looked fine. I did stop dryfiring it after i read about it.
 

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Always heard of the evils of dry firing but never quite understood why.

Thanks for the first coherent explanation that I've encountered on the subject. Well done!
It depends on the gun and model a lot. Most of the "evils" of dry firing do not happen on guns made since, I dunno, 1980 or later? To damage "modern" guns, like the kel tec, most would have to be fired an insane number of times, as others said. The thing to really know here is if you own any vintage guns, say from the 60s or earlier, it would be a bad plan to dry fire those at all, and very bad to do it a LOT --- and even moreso if the older gun is a rimfire (they tend to suffer more from it).
 

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and even moreso if the older gun is a rimfire (they tend to suffer more from it
That's because a rimfire will impact the shoulder of the chamber and cause peening.
 

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xndr512 said:
One thing I've noticed in dry fire threads is that nobody explains why it's not good to continually dry fire Kel-Tec pistols.
On the P11 as well as the PF9 and the second generation P32 and P3at, the firing pin is held in place by either a threaded hex socket (Allen head) set screw or hex socket button screw. This screw protrudes into the firing pin channel and into a "notch" in the firing pin. The threads on these screws run all the way to their ends. If the pistol is dry fired without a snap cap in place, the firing pin will fly farther foward than it would if a snap cap were in place to stop it. This will cause the rear of the firing pin's "notch" to slam into the retaining screw, which is threaded. If this is done many times, these threads can be deformed to the point that it may be impossible to remove the screw without damaging the threads in the slide.
Thank you for explaining.
 
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