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Discussion Starter · #42 · (Edited)
It sounds like Bushnell-Hoppe's told the Chinese to make cleaning gear and didn't follow up to insure compatibility with standard threads.
The brushes I bought are "almost" the right threads, but not quite.
I'm wondering if the brushes are actually a metric thread.
Sorry for the delay in responding. I remembered this only this morning.

You are correct, sir! The Hoppe's Tornado cleaning brush is metric - M8 x 1.0. It is not compatible with any shotgun cleaning rod except Hoppe's. With their Model 1401 "Cleaning Adaptor," the Tornado will work only with Hoppe's cleaning rods because the adaptor converts from M8 to 8/32 threads. Absent the adaptor, the Tornado will not work with any cleaning rod at all unless you somehow managed to acquire a metric cleaning rod in your travels about the world.

You can't trust any thread information on Hoppe's web site. The description for the Tornado on the web site says only that it has 5/16 threads, on the package it has the additional information of the thread pitch - 5/16-27, but neither are correct because the product itself has M8 x 1.0 threads.

Bottom Line: Some if not all of Hoppe's products are made in China (the Tornado package says so), there is little standardization when it comes to how the rod attachments are threaded (could be 5/16, 8/32, M8, or something else), so some Hoppe's products may not be compatible with anything other than other Hoppe's products and then perhaps only with one or other of their "cleaning adaptors." The mere existence of "cleaning adaptors" demonstrates how screwed up things are at Hoppe's.
 

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I wonder if the metric versus SAE threads are a Chinese mistake, or if Bushnell-Hoppe's is doing this deliberately?
The packaging labeling of 5/16x27 would possibly indicate a typical Chinese blooper, but that Bushnell-Hoppe's hasn't corrected it would indicate the other option.

This would also indicate the 9mm pistol brushes that are a lose fit in my rods are also metric.
What a disgrace.

When/if you ever hear from them let us know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
The heck of it is that a 5/16x27 die to chase those metric threads is so expensive, and you can't just go out and buy a bolt threaded 5/15x27 and fashion your own adaptor as I did with an ancient .410 brush. Worse still, Hoppe's is the only manufacturer you can find in most shops. So whatever you do, do not throw away old brushes and other rod-end devices unless you want to start all over with Hoppe's-only cleaning gear. I, for one, don't.
 

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I checked the 9mm brushes I bought at the same time.
Also made in China, and I suspect they're 4mm metric, even though the package says 8/32.

Possibilities here are that Hoppe's has decided to go metric, but that isn't explaining the package thread info.
I'm not all that up on what goes on in other countries, and whether Hoppe's even sells to other countries.
I wonder if there's even that much of a market for civilian cleaning accessories overseas, considering how anti gun they are and are becoming more so.
I would think the market overseas would not be all that big, and that they'd already have their own brands.
It's looking like Canada, as example will be a smaller market for pistol cleaning gear, so why go metric now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
It has been three weeks since I sent my letter to the Bushnell/Hoppe's VP for outdoor products. Still no response. At this point, I am entertaining the notion that I didn't tell Bushnell/Hoppe's anything they didn't know and they don't want to acknowledge it.
 

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On another site a member lives close to Bushnell/Hoppe's offices.
He stopped in and spoke to the receptionists about this.
She promised to have someone call him.

So far, no attempt to contact him so obviously the company has no interest in responding to customers.
So, buy American made cleaning gear.
Until further information, I won't be buying any Hoppe's equipment or bore solvent until I know where it comes from and what's in it now.

Hoppe's has been in business since 1903 but has voided all that history and customer loyalty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
On another site a member lives close to Bushnell/Hoppe's offices.
He stopped in and spoke to the receptionists about this.
She promised to have someone call him.

So far, no attempt to contact him so obviously the company has no interest in responding to customers.
So, buy American made cleaning gear.
Until further information, I won't be buying any Hoppe's equipment or bore solvent until I know where it comes from and what's in it now.

Hoppe's has been in business since 1903 but has voided all that history and customer loyalty.
I agree without reservation.
I know that there are alternatives to Hoppe's gun cleaning chemicals - lots of them.
But there seem to be very few alternatives to Hoppe's gun cleaning rods and rod-end accessories. Here in rural America, it's Hoppe's or nothing. (I have tried bore snakes, and I don't like them. I'm a bit old school, unrepentant in that, and will remain so.)
 

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Since the computer came along, I've always bought my cleaning gear online from Brownell's, Midway, Champions Choice, direct from the manufacturers, and others.
These sources sell American made gear, and you can get better rods, like Dewey, Pro Shot, Tipton, Birchwood Casey, and a good number more.

I've always bought only one piece polished stainless steel rods in all types. These are "buy once, cry once" lifetime tools that unless you bend them they last a lifetime.
Unlike brass or aluminum they can't damage anything unless you misuse them.
This is counterintuitive.....you'd think a softer brass or aluminum rod is safer, but the softer metals can embed grit that can scratch the muzzle or bore.
Hardened stainless can't do that, and unlike coated rods, there's no coating to peel off, so they last forever.

The only other good option are carbon fiber rods. These are either perfectly straight or they're broken.
The only watch-out is that the less expensive brands may have problems with the threaded insert coming out.

In short, a little shopping online can get all the high quality American made cleaning equipment you can ever need.
Unlike local stores, you can buy things like brushes and patches in bulk, at cheaper prices then locally, where they're sold individually.
I've always gone with the "Penny wise" Dollar foolish" theory that it's not smart to use cheap cleaning gear in expensive guns, especially customer guns that I need to protect.
All these cheap screw-together aluminum and brass rods, and now cheap brushes and gear from Hoppe's-China, is something I'm not willing to buy just to save a few penny's on.

So, no more Hoppe's gear, and just in case, after a life time of use, no more Hoppe's #9, unless and until I know where it's being made and what's in it.
There are too many newer solvents available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Addendum to the above: Aluminum rods are the worst. As aluminum oxidizes, aluminum oxide is formed. Aluminum oxide is so hard that it is used as an industrial abrasive. Many a muzzle has been ruined by cleaning from the muzzle end with aluminum rods. Neither brass, nor stainless steel, nor carbon fiber will do that. (But watch that the threaded joints of carbon fiber rods aren't aluminum.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
It has been five weeks since I sent my letter to the Hoppes/Bushnell vice president of outdoor products.
Still no response. They know exactly what they've done and do not intend to acknowledge it.
 

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Agreed.
As I said, on another forum a member lives close to their offices and actually stopped in and talked to a receptionist.
She promised to have someone call..............never happened.

I did look at a new bottle of Hoppe's #9 solvent and the bottle says "Made in USA".
I guess I can trust that labeling, but all my brushes will come from known American makers from now on.
 
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