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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The round not the gun. I've always wondered why the semi-rimmed .32 ACP had a rim in the first place since it headspaces on the case mouth anyway. Then thought that John Moses had tooling to cut it larger then the case already in place so why bother when in the beginning of the 1900's the thought of a pistol HP was unheard of. Then the discussion came up on another forum altogether about .32 vs .380 that the rim was there so it would chamber in the popular .32 Colt and S&W revolvers of that time and it actually can. I would have a problem with the higher pressured acp round in that top break S&W revolver though. I figured I would pole the .32 crowd for thoughts on the matter.
 

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That's my understanding, it was rimmed so it could be used in a revolver too. I don't know which model or anything else. I've heard you can buy a conversation cylinder for the old Nagant revolvers but I thought they were 30cal.
 

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That's my understanding, it was rimmed so it could be used in a revolver too.
I wonder. The 38 Auto and 38 Super are also semi-rim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No, the .38 ACP and the .38 Super sorta burned out a while back although the .38 Super was popular a while back in Mexico due to the silly law of "No military calibers" for civilians and the Super gave them a viable option to their then issued .45 autos.
 

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That's my understanding, it was rimmed so it could be used in a revolver too. I don't know which model or anything else. I've heard you can buy a conversation cylinder for the old Nagant revolvers but I thought they were 30cal.
Nope, there is indeed a .32 ACP conversion cylinder for the M1895 Nagant revolver.



Dunno if wheelguns were the idea behind giving the cartridge a rim, though ... considering .32 ACP = .32 AUTOMATIC Colt Pistol cartridge. :)
 

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.380 ACP isn't rimmed...but it's not the .38 ACP, either.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.38_ACP
My mistake, I've never heard of that one.

Nope, there is indeed a .32 ACP conversion cylinder for the M1895 Nagant revolver.



Dunno if wheelguns were the idea behind giving the cartridge a rim, though ... considering .32 ACP = .32 AUTOMATIC Colt Pistol cartridge. :)
Ok, I'm far from an expert nor am I a hand loader but how is that safe with the factory barrel?

7.62×38mmR uses 0.308" bullets
32acp is showing 0.3125" bullets.

Then again, 32acp is also called 7.65mm in Europe...
 

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No, the .38 ACP and the .38 Super sorta burned out a while back although the .38 Super was popular a while back in Mexico due to the silly law of "No military calibers" for civilians and the Super gave them a viable option to their then issued .45 autos.
The 38 Super is a souped up 38 ACP and effectively killed the older round. A 38 ACP pistol will chamber the 38 Super, but is a recipe for a kaboom. The 38 Super had an initial reputation for accuracy problems because they attempted to headspace it on the miniscule semi-rim. Once they moved to headspacing on the case mouth that problem was solved. Back in the day, with hot loads, it was considered to be almost as effective in a 1911 as the 357 Magnum. It is still very popular in Mexico and in the SW USA.
 

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Sorta keeping on topic. I'm looking for the new Ruger LCR 327 Federal Magnum. I understand it will shoot all(?) 32 caliber rounds; 32ACP (however they won't extract), 32 S&W, 32 H&R Magnum and of course the 327 Fed. mag. I think there is another 32 cal. round that it will handle. It's good that it can fire this variety of ammo because I have yet to find 327 Fed. Mag. in SW Ohio.
 

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Sorta keeping on topic. I'm looking for the new Ruger LCR 327 Federal Magnum. I understand it will shoot all(?) 32 caliber rounds; 32ACP (however they won't extract), 32 S&W, 32 H&R Magnum and of course the 327 Fed. mag. I think there is another 32 cal. round that it will handle. It's good that it can fire this variety of ammo because I have yet to find 327 Fed. Mag. in SW Ohio.
Don't forget .32 S&W and .32 S&W Long ... although those aren't very commonly found in stores and, when they are, they're quite pricey (unless you load your own).
 

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I don't think it is but the internal lock work of the revolver would not have to change to add a seventh round to the cylinder. Only the ratchet on the cylinder and the cylinder locking notches would be different.
Wrong. The hand that moves the cylinder is pushed upward by a cam or lever , depending on the make and model of any revolver, and that length of movement is directly related to the cocking mechanism. If the cylinder notches are closer together, the bolt will lock the cylinder before the cocking mechanism is fully armed because the hand will be stopped short of its full travel.
 

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I have a old S&W top break from 1880's Takes the short 32 round. The 32 auto won't fit all the way in the cylinder So pistol can't be closed I just tried it. This was a BP round so the 32 auto will ruin if fit and fired .
There were lots of BP designs. Some were strong and some were not. Shooting a higher pressure load is possible in many of them. Some of the top break designs, like my Iver Johnson were upgraded to smokeless powder loads. I really don't know about the early S&Ws compatability with smokeless loads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Wrong. The hand that moves the cylinder is pushed upward by a cam or lever , depending on the make and model of any revolver, and that length of movement is directly related to the cocking mechanism. If the cylinder notches are closer together, the bolt will lock the cylinder before the cocking mechanism is fully armed because the hand will be stopped short of its full travel.
So if the 1895 Nagant is a 6 shot revolver and darkwriters .32 ACP conversion cylinder for it is a 7 shot how does all this locking and cocking mechanism actually work?
 

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So if the 1895 Nagant is a 6 shot revolver and darkwriters .32 ACP conversion cylinder for it is a 7 shot how does all this locking and cocking mechanism actually work?
I don't think it will. Maybe the picture posted was a generic representation?
 

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Thinking a little more about the revolver action could the ratchet not be redesigned to work with a hand designed for a different number of chambers as is shown in this case? I thought I saw somewhere that all of the internal lockwork in Taurus small frame revolvers was the same. If the Taurus statement is true, that would be 5,6, and 8 shot revolvers all with the same hand.
 
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